"Christians and the Internet" newsletter
CATI, Vol. 1, No. 26:  June 30, 2000.
_______________________________________________________________
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. TOP 100 (GENERAL) WEB SITES: WHAT'S THE BEST LIST?
2. "BROKEN LINKS" ON THE WEB: WHAT TO DO ABOUT THEM
3. JAMES MONTGOMERY BOICE: A LIST OF ARTICLES AND BOOKS
4. SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION FOR THIS NEWSLETTER
_______________________________________________________________
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Copyright (C) 2000 by Barry Traver, All Rights Reserved.  For
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_______________________________________________________________
1. TOP 100 (GENERAL) WEB SITES: WHAT'S THE BEST LIST?
At a different time we may consider the question of what may
be considered to be the top 100 Christian Web sites (how would
you like to have to decide which sites to include and which
ones not to include in such a list?), but for this week our
topic is that of the top 100 sites in general rather than the
top 100 sites that are specifically Christian in perspective.    
Christians are human beings, and they believe that by God's
grace all human beings bear some marks of their having been
created in the image of the Creator God.  By that same grace
(some theologians refer to it as common grace), it is also
true that non-Christians can accomplish things that can be
beneficial to society, even though the glory of God may not
have been their motivation for doing so.
Thus we as Christians can benefit much at times from the
accomplishments of those who are not committed to Christ,
just as we (hopefully) can do things for the general good of
society in addition to sharing the good news of Jesus Christ
in particular.
In short, there are many very helpful Web sites that may not
be specifically Christian in perspective, and Christians
ought to be aware of such lists.
There have been many attempts to compose lists of the "top
100 Web sites," but they have not been equally successful.
Some lists, for example, are based primarily or solely on
"popularity," which in itself is no real indication that a
particular Web site is worthwhile.  There are some lists,
however, that are genuinely useful guides to important sites
that may be helpful to many people.
My own top choice of such lists is PC Magazine's list of
"Top 100 Web Sites," a list that was revised on April 26,
2000:
PC Magazine: The Top 100 Web Sites by Don Willmott
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2394453,00.html
In fact, if I were to make up my own list of the "Top 100 Web
Sites," much of my list would appear on PC Magazine's list (or
vice versa, if you prefer to look at it that way).
Here are the twenty categories:
Careers
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395090,00.html
Chat/Community
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395092,00.html
Computing
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395109,00.html
Experts/Opinions
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395137,00.html
Family/Education
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395151,00.html
Financial/Investing
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395153,00.html
Lifestyle
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395153,00.html
Portals/Start Pages
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395160,00.html
Reference
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395162,00.html
Search
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395176,00.html  
Shopping Assistants
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395188,00.html
Shopping: Computing
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395198,00.html
Shopping; Dept. Store/Mall
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395202,00.html
Shopping: Person-to-Person
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395210,00.html
Shopping: Specialty
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395216,00.html  
Small-Business Services
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395218,00.html
Small-Business Setup
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395221,00.html
Surfing Assistants
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395147,00.html
Travel
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395227,00.html
Web Development
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395020,00.html
And here are a few of the "Top 100 Web Sites," according to
PC Magazine, along with PC Magazine's comments:
About.com
"At first glance, About.com looks like any other directory or
portal, but who are those people on the home page? They’re a
few of the site’s 700 guides, people who have signed up to
take responsibility for a particular subcategory within the
site’s 18 major categories. Anyone with a particular area of
expertise is invited to apply, and those who become guides are
paid on the basis of the traffic they generate. The end result
is hundreds of specialized miniportals that are great starting
points from which to learn something new or increase your
knowledge base."
  http://www.about.com/ 
Britannica.com 
"It seems unlikely that you’ll ever find an encyclopedia
salesman knocking on your door again, now that the contents
of the Encyclopedia Britannica are available online for free,
along with related articles from dozens of top magazines and
links to 125,000 Web sites. Though the site was overwhelmed
with visitors when it launched in October, response times
have now improved. It’s a remarkable research tool, and when
you think about it, it’s probably worth the cost of a computer
to have such a resource available."
  http://www.britannica.com
CNET.com
"CNET is a well-designed technology portal that reports on
computing products and trends and discusses living with the
technology around us. You’ll find technology news (a TV news
show debuted last fall), product reviews, and links to its
TV shows. Head to Download.com for free software and to
Gamecenter.com for fun and games...."
  http://cnet.com/
Google 
"Google started out as a Stanford University project designed
to find the most relevant Web pages for a search by assigning
a higher weight to those pages that have the most links to
them from other high-quality pages. It’s an excellent idea.
Google has an uncanny knack for returning extremely relevant
results. Try it just once, and you’ll see how different the
search results are from those you get using other search
engines."
  http://www.google.com/
Homestead
"The old Homestead has recently gone through a renovation,
making it easier than ever for anyone to set up a small Web
site. It’s easy to drag and drop content, commerce, and
community elements right onto your pages; no coding or form
filling is required. More than 100 elements are available.
With well over 3 million sites already built, Homestead must
be doing something right."
  http://www.homestead.com/
SuperFamily.com 
"Want to set up a Web site so your extended family can
exchange photos, news, and calendars? This is the place to
do it, where free sites are a breeze to set up and maintain.
(You get 15MB of storage and can pay for more.) Most
notable are the photography tools, but you can also make
a family newspaper, share shopping and wish lists, hold
discussions, and trade e-mails...."
  http://www.superfamily.com/
SurfMonkey Kids Channel
"Parents who worry about where their kids go on the Web should
take a look at this fun and family-friendly Web directory.
Every link is guaranteed to be great for kids, and you can add
the SurfMonkey Bar, a compact 'cybershield' that sits at the
bottom of Internet Explorer window. SurfMonkey even has its
own kid-friendly browser to make sure that the little ones
never wander off the straight and narrow."
  http://www.surfmonkey.com/
ZDNet
"ZDNet (PC Magazine’s home on the Web) underwent a redesign
last October to make its many resources much more visible.
The site offers a seemingly endless supply of breaking news
and analysis, along with product and game reviews.... The
huge Software Library continues to add dozens of downloads
each day. At the relaunched SmartPlanet.com, you can choose
from among 350 computing courses, and the recently added
Updates.com lets you get automatic notification when the
software you use needs a bug fix or upgrade." 
  http://www.zdnet.com/
Next week (D.V.) I'll have more to say about PC Magazine's
list of the "Top 100 Web Sites" -- and I'll have more "top
100" lists for you! -- but for now (using your Christian
discretion) have fun doing some exploring!
_______________________________________________________________
2. "BROKEN LINKS" ON THE WEB: WHAT TO DO ABOUT THEM
First, some simple definitions.  What's a "link"?  Basically,
a "link" is something you click on to get from one place on
the Web to another.  It's usually text (often underlined), but
it could be a picture.  ("Link" is short for "hyperlink,"
which used to be short for "hypertext link," but that was
before the Web got so graphics-oriented.)  And a "broken link"
is simply a link that doesn't work.
Instead of your browser loading in the page you wanted, you
get an error message, such as "Cannot find server or DNS
Error" (Internet Explorer) or "Netscape is unable to locate
the server..." (Netscape Communicator).  This means that the
Web browser was unable even to connect to the computer that
is supposed to have the page, much less check for the page.
(Such a computer is known as a "server.")
Or, more frequently, you may get the error message "HTTP 404 -
File not found" (Internet Explorer) or "The requested URL ...
was not found on this server" (Netscape Communicator).  This
means that the Web browser was able to connect to the computer
to request the page, but the computer replied, "Sorry, I don't
have it."  (For example, the Webmaster for the site may have
deleted the file or moved it to a different location on the
host computer.)
How bad is the problem?  Here are some statistics from Franck
Jeannin:
"In a well-regarded survey by Georgia Tech, regular Web users
cited broken links as their major complaint with the Web after
speed.... In fact, it is now so prevalent as to have a term
coined for it: Jakob Nielsen, an acknowledged Web usability
expert, calls the phenomenon 'linkrot.' Estimates suggest
that up to 10 percent of all links on the Web are broken,
and that nearly one page in three contains broken links. For
search engines, the figures are even worse. Because the Web is
growing faster than search engines can index it, some search
engines have up to 20 percent broken links."
  --Newmedia: Pure Science: Broken Links (4/24/00)
    http://www.newmedia.com/SEBText/000002393.html
Don't give up, however!  There are some things you can do and
sometimes things you should perhaps do as a good "Netizen" or
good citizen of the InterNet.  The changing nature of the Web
makes "broken links" a regular experience, but you can often
still find what you were looking for and often as a Christian
be of help to those who are seeking to provide you with links
to such information.  (For example, a Webmaster may not even
be aware that he has a "broken link" on his site.  If you let
him know about it, he not only will be grateful, but also may
be able to repair the link.)
Let's suppose you got the dreaded "HTTP 404 - File not found"
message.  What are some of the things you can do?
First, if you got the error message as a result of typing in a
Web address by hand rather than as a result of clicking on a
link on a Web page, it may be that you are the one at fault!
(The Web address is that thing that starts with "http//...";
it is sometimes called a "URL" for "Uniform Resource Locator"
by computer geeks, but all that "URL" really means is "Web
address.")  The Web can be very unforgiving:  if you typed in
any part of the URL incorrectly, you may get an error message
instead of getting to where you wanted to go.
So check to make sure that you made no mistakes when you put
the address in the "Address" bar in Internet Explorer or in
the "Location" bar in Netscape Communicator.  For example,
many Web pages are on computers running something called
UNIX (different from Windows), and lower case and upper case
are not regarded the same way by UNIX.  (Yes, with Windows
myfile.htm and MyFile.HTM would be regarded as the same file,
but not so for UNIX!).  Therefore be very careful with such
things as capitalization, spelling, etc.
Secondly, if you got the error message as a result of clicking
on a Web page, the fault isn't yours, but don't be too quick
to blame the author of the Web page containing the link.  The
link may have been a working link at one time, but at a later
time the file at that URL (Web address) may have been deleted
or moved to another location by the Webmaster of the site you
are trying to reach.  So what can you do to try to locate the
Web page or the information on it?
One thing that would be nice to do is to send an email to the
person upon whose site you found the broken link.  Usually,
that person is not aware that the link is broken, and he or
she will thus appreciate being made aware that the link is no
longer working so that (if possible) the link can be fixed.
That person may be able to point you in the right direction
for the material you're after, in fact.
If clicking on a link produces a typical "404" error message,
one approach to try is what I call "go back up the branches"
approach.  Take the same URL and try it again, but this time
remove everything after the last forward slash.  Maybe that
will provide additional useful information (which may even
link to the page you're after).  If you get another error
message, then take that URL and try again, but again remove
everything after the last forward slash.  And so on.  (You
can keep trying, as long as there you've got another branch
to go back.)
Maybe a specific example will make it clear.  Suppose you
are trying to find www.host.com/homepages/users/book.htm and
get a "404 - File not found" error message.  The next thing
to do is to try www.host.com/homepages/users/.  If that does
not work, try www.host.com/homepages/ (and so on).  If you
are fortunate, on one of those pages you'll find a (working)
link to the page you're after.  If that doesn't happen, you
may at least find a page containing the email address of the
Webmaster of the site, so that you can send a note to him or
her about the missing file.
Picture the situation as something like a tree, where one of
the end branches has gotten broken off.  The left part of the
address is like the trunk of the tree.  In the example just
given, "www.host.com" would be the trunk.  Then "homepages"
would be a big branch going off of "www.host.com," "users"
would be a somewhat smaller branch going off of "users," and
"book.htm" would be that end branch that got broken off.  I
call the approach the "go back up the branches" approach for
this reason:  you're continuing to work backwards up the tree
until you hopefully find something which hasn't gotten broken
off and which may provide helpful information.
A different approach would be to let search engines do some
looking for you.  Here's where you can find some CATI articles
on search engines:
CATI: Finding Information on the Web: Using Search Engines
  http://www.traver.org/cati/archives/cati12.htm#3
CATI: Finding Information: Family-Filtered Search Engines
  http://www.traver.org/cati/archives/cati13.htm#3
True, the search engine may provide you with many more broken
links (including the one you started with), but here are some
other possible results of using a search engine, mentioned by
Tilman Hausherr:
"o You find the site you searched for.
"o You find a site that links to the site you searched for.
"o You find a site that links to the site you searched for,
but is also broken. E-mail the site owner, and tell him that
the link is broken. Bookmark the site and revisit it in a
week, to see if the other person has found it. If not, you
have nevertheless succeeded in making the other person feel
as bad as you, which brings some relief :-)
"o You find the new e-mail address of the user. Either e-mail
him, or try to construct the URL yourself (user@host.com
leads to http://www.host.com/~user/)....
Xenu's Link Sleuth
  http://home.snafu.de/tilman/xenulink.html
And he adds this word of encouragement:
"If you are still unsuccessful, ... repeat your attempts after
a month (some sites might appear at a search engine after some
time). Sometimes it happens that a host is reorganizing its
hard disk, and all user pages get back within a few days."
  http://home.snafu.de/tilman/xenulink.html
IMPORTANT TIP:  Some search engines (such as Google) may give
you the same broken link you already have, BUT also give you
the opportunity of looking at a cached version of the Web
page!  Sometimes that can be just as useful as actually being
able to get to the "real" page itself, since it is often the
information on the page that you're after, right?  What does
it matter if you're looking at a previous "snapshot" of the
Web page (presented by a search engine) rather than the actual
page itself (which may no longer be available)?  Here is where
you'll find Google:
  http://www.google.com/
I've used this method myself to look at a Web page after it is
no longer directly available on the Web.
If you have your own Web page, you can use similar methods to
fixing any broken links on your own Web site, but how do you
know if you have broken links?
An article at the PR2 site suggests two useful services on the
Web:
"If you prefer to work directly off the Web, and your site has
25 links or less, head over to the Web Site Garage, where you
can enter your site's URL and get a free check of your links.
This check is very, very FAST.
"Continuing the greasy overall theme, NetMechanic has a free
link checker that can handle hundreds of links, though it is
much slower than [Web Site Garage].  I suggest that you always
choose to run jobs in background mode, and submit your email
address to receive the results. That way, you don't have to
stay online for hours watching your links getting checked one
by one."
--PR2: Track Down & Fix Broken Links
    http://www.pr2.com/feature8.htm
And here are the sites for Web Site Garage and NetMechanic:
Web Site Garage
  http://websitegarage.netscape.com/
NetMechanic
  http://www.netmechanic.com/
If you fit within the guidelines, these two services check
your sites for broken links for free.  Free software that I
like very much (but don't use as frequently as I should) is
a program by Tilman Hausherr:
Xenu's Link Sleuth
  http://home.snafu.de/tilman/xenulink.html
"Broken links" are a fact of life on the Web, but using the
tips in this article you can often solve the problem of "the
broken link."  And as you inform Web page authors of broken
links on their Web pages, you can make your own contribution
toward making the World Wide Web a better world (at least so
far as helping others locate useful information is concerned).
_______________________________________________________________
3. JAMES MONTGOMERY BOICE: A LIST OF ARTICLES AND BOOKS
CATI 1/23 contained a memorial tribute to Dr. James Montgomery
Boice.  Here's an expanded list of articles by Dr. Boice that
you can find on the World Wide Web:
"Christmas in Eden" (from The King Has Come)
  http://www.alliancenet.org/month/99.12.jmb.kingcome.html
"An Introduction to the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals'
    Cambridge Summit"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr96/1996.04.JulAug/mr9604.jmb.AllianceIntro.html
"Looking Toward 2000: Where Will Evangelicalism Be Then?"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr97/1997.05.SepOct/mr9705.jmb.2000.html
"On My Mind: Children's Sermons"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr99/1999.06NovDec/mr9906.omm.jmb.children.html
"On My Mind: The Druids Are Coming"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr99/1999.04.JulAug/mr9904.omm.jmb.druids.html
"On My Mind: Haldane's Revival"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr00/2000.01.JanFeb/mr0001.omm.jmb.Haldane's.html
"On My Mind: It Takes Time"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr00/2000.02.MarApr/mr0002.omm.jmb.time.html
"On My Mind: Luther Baiting and Modern Nomads"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr98/1998.01.JanFeb/mr9801.omm.dw.luther.html
"On My Mind: Recovering Our Lost Confidence"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr99/1999.01.JanFeb/mr9901.omm.jmb.recovering.html
"On My Mind: Our All-Too-Easy Conscience"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr98/1998.05.SepOct/mr9805.omm.jmb.conscience.html
"On My Mind: Repenting Always"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr99/1999.02.MarApr/mr9902.omm.jmb.repenting.html
"On My Mind: The Rich and the Wretched"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr98/1998.02.MarApr/mr9802.omm.richandwretche.html
"On My Mind: Salad Bar Sanctuaries"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr99/1999.05.SepOct/mr9905.omm.jmb.Salad.html
"On My Mind: Throw Away Lines"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr98/1998.06.NovDec/mr9806.omm.jmb.lines.html
    OR
  http://www.u-turn.net/6-3/lines.html
"The Real Meaning of Christmas" (from the Christ of Christmas)
  http://forerunner.com/mandate/X0037_The_Real_Meaning_of_.html
"Reformed Theology"
  http://lonestar.texas.net/~rhanks/site/Gallery/Boice/boicetheology.htm
   or http://www.eefweb.org/info/THEOLOGY.HTM
"Snake in the Garden" (from Genesis: An Expositional
    Commentary)
  http://208.55.129.251/satan.html
"Wanted: Thinking Christians"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr94/1994.04.JulAug/mr9404.jmb.think.html
"Whatever Happened To God?"
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr96/1996.04.JulAug/mr9604.jmb.whatever.html
"A Roundtable Discussion with...J.I. Packer, James M. Boice,
    Richard Halverson, William Pannell, and Michael S. Horton
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr93/1993.03.MayJun/mr9303.int.roundtable.html
Many of the preceding articles originally appeared in Modern
Reformation, a publication of the Alliance of Confessing
Evangelicals, an organization Dr. Boice served as President.
And -- although you can't read the books on the Web -- here
is where you can find information at Amazon.com about some of
Dr. Boice's books that are currently in print:
Acts: An Expositional Commentary 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/080101137X/travertabletalk
Christ's Call to Discipleship 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0825420741/travertabletalk
Dealing with Bible Problems
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0875084788/travertabletalk
Foundations of God's City: Christians in a Crumbling Culture 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0830822259/travertabletalk
Foundations of the Christian Faith
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0877849919/travertabletalk
Galatians/Ephesians
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0310201179/travertabletalk
Genesis: An Expositional Commentary 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011604/travertabletalk
Genesis: An Expositional Commentary: Genesis 1-11
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011612/travertabletalk
Genesis: An Expositional Commentary: Genesis 12-36 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011620/travertabletalk
Genesis: An Expositional Commentary: Genesis 37-50
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011639/travertabletalk
The Glory of God's Grace: The Meaning of God's Grace-And How
    It Can Change Your Life 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0825420725/travertabletalk
The Gospel of John: An Expositional Commentary
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011876/travertabletalk
The Gospel of John: The Coming of the Light, John 1-4 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011825/travertabletalk
The Gospel of John: Christ and Judaism, John 5-8 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/080101073X/travertabletalk
The Gospel of John: Those Who Received Him, John 9-12 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/080101087X/travertabletalk
The Gospel of John: Peace in Storm, John 13-17 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/080101106X/travertabletalk
The Gospel of John: Triumph Through Tragedy, John 18-21 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011833/travertabletalk
The King Has Come
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1857920066/travertabletalk
Living by the Book: The Joy of Loving and Trusting God's Word;
    Based on Psalm 119 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801057582/travertabletalk
The Minor Prophets
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0825421489/travertabletalk
Ordinary Men Called by God: A Study of Abraham, Moses, and
    David 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/082542075X/travertabletalk
Parables of Jesus
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0802401635/travertabletalk
Philippians: An Expositional Commentary 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011906/travertabletalk
Psalms: An Expositional Commentary
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011744/travertabletalk
Psalms: An Expositional Commentary: Psalms 1-41 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801010772/travertabletalk
Psalms: An Expositional Commentary: Psalms 42-106 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011183/travertabletalk
Psalms: An Expositional Commentary: Psalms 107-150
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011647/travertabletalk
Romans: An Expositional Commentary (4 Vol. Set)
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801011094/travertabletalk
Romans: Justification by Faith: Romans 1-4 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801010020/travertabletalk
Romans: The Reign of Grace: Romans 5-8
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801010039/travertabletalk
Romans: God and History: Romans 9-11 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801010586/travertabletalk
Romans: The New Humanity: Romans 12-16 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/080101039X/travertabletalk
Standing on the Rock: Upholding Biblical Authority in a
    Secular Age 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0825420733/travertabletalk
Sure I Believe--So What?
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1857920953/travertabletalk
Two Cities, Two Loves: Christian Responsibility in a Crumbling Culture 
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0830819878/travertabletalk
Dr. Boice also wrote many other helpful books which -- although
currently out-of-print -- you may be able to track down in a used
bookstore:
Amazing Grace
Awakening to God
Can You Run Away from God?
The Christ of Christmas
The Christ of the Empty Tomb
Daniel: An Expositional Commentary
Does Inerrancy Matter?
The Epistles of John
Hearing God When You Hurt
How to Live the Christian Life
Joshua: We Will Serve the Lord
Mind Renewal in a Mindless Age: Preparing to Think and Act
  Biblically: A Study of Romans 12:1-2
Nehemiah: Learning to Lead
The Sermon on the Mount
Witness and Revelation in the Gospel of John
There are a number of sources online for used books.  Here
is one I've sometimes found helpful:
  http://www.abebooks.com/
(In a future issue of CATI I hope to include an article on some
of the better places to buy books online.)
The preceding lists do not pretend to be complete (although
the list of books still in print should be close!), but they
suggest the extent of Dr. Boice's contribution to evangelical
Christianity in our time.  And his ministry is continued in
written form, on and off the Web.  Praise God for such a
capable and devoted servant! 
________________________________________________________________
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________________________________________________________________
Unless otherwise indicated, all material in this newsletter is
Copyright (C) 2000 by Barry Traver, All Rights Reserved.  For
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