"Christians and the Internet" newsletter
CATI, Vol. 1, No. 44:  November 3, 2000.
_______________________________________________________________

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.  FREE NIV BIBLE--PLUS FREE SOFTWARE!--ON CD-ROM: AN UPDATE
2.  HAVING A CHRISTIAN WORLDVIEW & SETTING BIBLICAL BOUNDARIES
3.  THE 3RD COMMANDMENT AND A "SICK BIRD" JOKE ILLUSTRATION
4.  SEARCH ENGINES: ANOTHER ADVANTAGE OF GOOGLE
5.  SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION FOR THIS NEWSLETTER
_______________________________________________________________

Unless otherwise indicated, all material in this newsletter is
Copyright (C) 2000 by Barry Traver, All Rights Reserved.  For
permission to reproduce material from this newsletter, contact
Barry Traver at cati@traver.org.  Permission is hereby granted,
however, to pass along this issue to others, provided that (1)
no changes are made and (2) it is passed along in its entirety.

To subscribe, write to cati@traver.org, including "Subscribe to
CATI" in the Subject line and including in the body your real
name and the email address to which you wish CATI sent.
_______________________________________________________________

1. FREE NIV BIBLE--PLUS FREE SOFTWARE!--ON CD-ROM: AN UPDATE

Of the making of modern translations of the Bible there seems
to be no end.  Even if your favorite version is still the King
James Version, you may want to use a modern translation as an
aid to understanding the Elizabethan or Shakespearean English
of the KJV.  Some of the better English translations of the
20th century are the New American Standard Bible (NASB), the
New International Version (NIV), and the New King James
Version (NKJV).  I find all of these to be helpful.

Because of its importance, it is good to have a copy of the
New International Version even if you ordinarily use another
translation.  Here is background on the NIV, taken from the
"Preface" that appears in most editions:

"The New International Version is a completely new translation
of the Holy Bible made by over a hundred scholars working
directly from the best available Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek
texts.... [By "completely new" is meant a fresh translation
from the ancient manuscripts rather than simply an attempt
to modernize the language of the King James Version.  --BAT]

"The fact that participants from the United States, Great
Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand worked together
gave the project its international scope.  That they were from
many denominations--including Anglican, Assemblies of God,
Baptist, Brethren, Christian Reformed, Church of Christ,
Evangelical Free, Lutheran, Mennonite, Methodist, Nazarene,
Presbyterian, Wesleyan and other churches--helped to safeguard
the translation from sectarian bias."

In a previous issue of CATI I told you how you could get an
absolutely free NIV on CD-ROM directly from the publisher.
All you have to do is request their NIV brochure (also free):

FREE NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION ON CD-ROM FROM ZONDERVAN!
  http://www.traver.org/cati/archives/cati39.htm#3

Here, again, are the details:

"Obtain a copy of this brochure and you will receive with it a
free CD-ROM containing the full searchable NIV and NIrV Bible
texts. Order by calling 1-800-727-3480. When you order the
brochure with CD, mention the ISBN number (0-310-99975-8) and
the Source Code (270003)."
  http://www.zondervanbibles.com/NIVNIrV/cd.html

I requested my copy, and I received it within a few days.  If
you have not yet requested yours, the offer at this time seems
to be still in effect and you may want to take advantage of
it, even if you already have a copy of the NIV.

The reason for that is that not only do you get a copy of the
NIV on CD-ROM that you can access with your computer, but also
you get free Zondervan Reference Software to help you use it
efficiently.

The rest of this article provides an introduction to some of
the things you can do using that software.  It may or may not
make much sense unless you've ordered the free NIV CD-ROM, so
that may be another reason for you to take advantage of the
offer .

By the way, the CD-ROM also includes a free copy of the NIrV
(New International Reader's Version, which is "The NIV for
Kids"), although I'm not particularly excited by that new
translation, so the first thing I do when I load the software
is to close down the "NIrV" window and the "NIRVINF" window
so that they do not clutter up the screen.

One thing you will want to do is to set up the program so that
it will work with your favorite word processor.  Here's how to
do that, using the top menu bar.  Click on "File," click on
"Preferences," and click on "External Wordprocessor."  You do
need to know where your word processor is and what the name of
its filename is.  I'm using Microsoft Word.  Its filename is
WINWORD.EXE and it's located here on my computer:

  C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\WINWORD.EXE

I used the "Browse" button to get to that file, so I didn't
have to type it in by hand.  (If you need help in finding your
word processor "EXE File," let me know, and I'll try to help.)
For "Text in Title Bar" I simply used "Microsoft Word" (but
without the quotation marks, of course), and I didn't put
anything in the "Word Processor Paste Command" box.  (Well,
that's not strictly true.  I did try something, but it didn't
work, so I let the Zondervan software use the "default" value
and it worked fine.)  Click on "OK" and you should then be in
business.

What's this do for you?  Well, you can highlight text and then
use the "Copy to Wordprocessor" command on the "File" menu to
copy any highlighted text directly to your word processor at
the place where the cursor is in your word processor program
(which you should have running at the same time).  A keyboard
shortcut to do this is Ctrl-Shift-C if you prefer to do that
instead of using the menu.  (You can also, of course, copy
highlighted text to the Windows clipboard instead in the usual
way.)

Incidentally, don't ask me why Zondervan decided to write
"Wordprocessor" as one word or why they decided to use lower
case for the "r" in "NIrV" when "NIV" is all in upper case.
I guess publishers get to make their own rules about correct
writing .

Now here's an exercise that illustrates how to do some simple
things with the Zondervan software.  Right now the only window
open in the program should be an "NIV" window.  Let's open
another "NIV" window.  To do that, click on "File," "Open
Text," and "New International Version."

Now two "NIV" windows are open, but the screen is rather,
well, not so neat.  You could manually move and resize the
windows, but there's a simpler way:  Click on "Window" on
the top menu bar and then click on "Tile."  Now the two
windows are very neatly placed side by side.

Both windows are set to Genesis 1:1 (the default).  Let's
compare Genesis 1:1 and John 1:1.  Click on the title bar
of the right window (that's called "selecting" the window)
so that the software will know which window you want to
work with.

Now click on "Search" and then click on "Verses."  (As an
alternative to using the menu, you can press Ctrl-G.)  We
want to set the right window to John 1:1.  Here's one way
to do that:  type "John" in the "Book" box, press the Tab
key, type "1" in the "Chapter" box, press the Tab key,
type "1" in the "Verse" box, press the Tab key, and press
the Enter key.  (Or, if you prefer, you can accomplish the
equivalent using the mouse instead of the keyboard, but
the procedure is a bit different.)

Let's now search for the phrase "in the beginning."  We'll
search the whole Bible, even though we already know that
two places where the phrase occurs are Genesis 1:1 and John
1:1.  Click on "Search," click on "Words & Phrases," put "in
the beginning" in the "Find:" box, put a check in the "Search
in all open windows" box, and leave the "Range" box set to
"Bible."  Then click on "OK," and you'll see that the phrase
"in the beginning" appears in five places in the Bible.

In the left "NIV" window click on "PS 102:25" and in the right
window click on "HEB 1:10."  In this way in the left window
you can see the Psalm quoted in the Hebrews passage in the
right window.

That's just a quick introduction to some of the things you
can do with the free Zondervan Reference Software that comes
with the free CD-ROM from Zondervan.  (You don't even have
to pay shipping and handling!)  There is much more that you
can do with the software, but I'll let you explore that on
your own at this point.

Two important parts of the program with which you should
become familiar are the "Help" menu and the "Preferences"
option on the "File" menu (which you can use to set display
font and otherwise to customize the program to your own
liking).

Now that I've told you how to get the NIV (and useful related
software) for free, I can tell you where on the Internet you
can get (almost) for free the NIV Study Bible on CD-ROM (or
at least all the NIV Study Bible book introductions and verse
commentary plus other useful Bible study tools).  But that
will have to wait for a future issue....
_______________________________________________________________

2. HAVING A CHRISTIAN WORLDVIEW & SETTING BIBLICAL BOUNDARIES

In a previous issue of CATI I mentioned my future plans to
review the book A Christian Parent's Guide to Making the
Internet Family Friendly by Brian Lang and Bill Wilson, a
book published by Nelson Publishers in 1999:

WHAT'S IN A NAME (AN INTERNET DOMAIN NAME, THAT IS)?
  http://www.traver.org/cati/archives/cati41.htm#2

This is not that full review.  More comments are planned for
a future issue of CATI.  In the meantime, you can also learn
more about the book from Amazon.com (or even order a copy,
if you'd like to do so):

Brian Lang & Bill Wilson, A Christian Parent's Guide to Making
    the Internet Family Friendly
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0785275681/travertabletalk

In spite of some idiosyncrasies and curiosities, this is one
of the few worthwhile books for Christians about the Internet.
I'll deal with the idiosyncrasies and curiosities in a future
issue, but for now I'd like to give you a taste of some of the
really helpful remarks in the book, looking in particular at
its discussion of how important it is for parents to have a
Christian worldview and to set Biblical boundaries in the area
of the Internet.

In order to keep within the boundaries myself (the boundaries
of the "fair use" provision of U.S. copyright law), the quotes
will be fairly short (you can see the book itself for a more
thorough discussion), but they should give you a good idea of
the helpfulness of the book.

First, here is what the authors have to say about "Your Web
Worldview":

"Simply stated, a worldview begins with the parents'
interpretation of the world and how to apply it to life.
Worldviews are promoted by television, movies, churches,
and now the Internet.  Naturalism, or human secularism,
is a popular worldview.... A naturalist promotes science
and evolution as the centerpiece of knowledge and morals,
and believes that God is irrelevant. This is the complete
opposite of Christian theism, which places God at the
center of all things--the Creator of the universe, the
Savior of mankind, the provider of guidelines for moral
conduct, and the spiritual source of man's purpose.  It is
critical that parents and family members have a clearly
defined worldview, as your beliefs will impact the Internet
and be challenged in return."
  --Brian Lang & Bill Wilson, A Christian Parent's Guide
      to Making the Internet Family Friendly, p. 27.

But it's not enough to have a Christian worldview.  It is
important to go on to create a family policy related to the
Internet, including the setting of Biblical boundaries.
So here is some of what Lang and Wilson have to say about
"Creating a Family Policy":

"... A successful family policy begins with setting online
boundaries (the borders you establish for yourself or your
family to protect each of you from harmful behavior and
influences).... Most areas of the Internet are fine for
family travel, but others should obviously be off-limits
.... In addition to where your family is allowed to travel
online, there should be guidelines for what information
they are allowed to give out while chatting online."
  --Brian Lang & Bill Wilson, A Christian Parent's Guide
      to Making the Internet Family Friendly, pp. 28-29.

Here, greatly abbreviated, are their suggestions related to
"Typical Internet Rules" that a family might set up:

"The are five criteria you should consider when establishing
family boundaries on the Internet:

"1. Understand what you are up against.  A healthy respect
for what can happen on the Internet if you're not careful is
the beginning of a good boundary....

"2. Establish an honest Internet persona.... One boundary
ought to be that you will be the same person in the
virtual world that you are in the real world. You may
have a different nickname, but you should exhibit the same
personality on the Internet....

"3. Language is the currency of the Internet.... Using correct
language when online does not end with just discouraging
vulgar talk.... The language in chat, discussion threads,
or in E-mail should not be different from the language you
normally use.

"4. Monitor the time spent online. Just as the amount of time
is limited for family members using the telephone or watching
television, there should be limits on the time spent on the
Internet....

"5. Set biblical boundaries...."

  --Brian Lang & Bill Wilson, A Christian Parent's Guide
      to Making the Internet Family Friendly, pp. 30-33.

Their discussion of setting Biblical boundaries is especially
helpful:

"As a suggestion, start by reviewing the Ten Commandments
in Exodus 20:1-17. Then stop at Deuteronomy 27:15-26 and
read the curses for not obeying the Word of God. Move on
to Galatians 5:16-25, where walking in the Spirit is
distinguished from lusts of the flesh. Then read Ephesians
5:1-21 about being imitators of God and children of light
.... And last, study Ephesians 6:10-20 to learn how to
protect yourself with the full armor of God.

"Write these into your computer. Print them out for each
member of the family. Study them together. Frame them and
put them over the computer. There is nothing on the Internet
that these verses in the Bible do not address. If you and
your family ... follow these 'biblical boundaries,' you
will have a clear sense of right and wrong and a clear set
of boundaries to guide you while in cyberspace."

  --Brian Lang & Bill Wilson, A Christian Parent's Guide
      to Making the Internet Family Friendly, p. 33.

These somewhat extensive quotations from the book may show
why I made my earlier statement that in spite of a few
peculiarities, this is one of the very few worthwhile books
currently available for Christians about the Internet.

If you're interested in purchasing a copy, check your local
bookstore. If you can't find it there, you can get it through
Amazon.com, as I mentioned earlier:

Brian Lang & Bill Wilson, A Christian Parent's Guide to Making
    the Internet Family Friendly
  http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0785275681/travertabletalk

Enjoy!
_______________________________________________________________

3. THE 3RD COMMANDMENT AND A "SICK BIRD" JOKE ILLUSTRATION

Quick question:  Without looking up the answer in Exodus 20
or Deuteronomy 5, what is the third commandment in the list
of the Ten Commandments?

Many Christians profess allegiance to the Ten Commandments,
but few can actually name them (particularly in order).  So
if you had trouble, you're not alone.  (My son was able to
answer the question because of a song he had learned about
the Ten Commandments as a child, but that's another topic
for another time.)

Here's the third commandment:

"Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain
...." (Exodus 20:7, KJV).

And here's what question #99 of the Heidelberg Catechism, a
historic Protestant creed, has to say about it:

"Q. 99:  What is God's will for us in the third commandment?
 A. 99:  That we neither blaspheme nor misuse the name of
God by cursing, perjury, or unnecessary oaths, nor share in
such horrible sins by being silent bystanders.  In a word, it
requires that we use the holy name of God only with reverence
and awe, so that we may properly confess him, pray to him,
and praise him in everything."
  --Ecumenical Creeds and Reformed Confessions (Board of
      Publications of the Christian Reformed Church, 1979),
      p. 49.

This should be our guideline, on and off the Internet.  We
should be careful about our own language, and -- when the
situation warrants it -- we should gently rebuke others
when they break this commandment explicitly or implicitly.

Here's an example illustration of a wife's correcting her
husband in this area from a "sick bird" joke sent to me by
JokesEveryDay.com (whose goal is to supply people "with
clean and enjoyable humor"):

"A happily married man had only one complaint, his wife was
always nursing sick birds.

"One November evening, he came home to find a raven with a
splint on its beak sitting in his favorite chair. On the
dining room table there was a feverish eagle pecking at
an aspirin while in the kitchen his wife was comforting a
shivering little wren that she found in the snow.

"The furious spouse strode over to where his wife was towering
down the cold little bird. 'I can't take it any more! We've
got to get rid of all of these darn...'

"The wife held up her hand to cut him off in mid-curse.
'Please, Dear,' she said, 'Not in front of the chilled wren.'"

  http://jokeseveryday.com/

  That was painful, especially for those who find it
difficult to endure the punishment of such puns.  (One such
person responded by saying "I thought there was something
ill eagle about sick bird jokes." )  But the
story does illustrate the importance of taking care with our
language, not necessarily because of the presence of the
"chilled wren" present, but because of the presence of the
omnipresent God whose eye is on the sparrow (Matthew 10:29)
and who calls us to trust in His name and to mount up with
wings like eagles (Isaiah 40:30-31).

It's not enough not to curse:  Christians must praise God and
bless His name in all places (and that includes the Internet
and the World Wide Web)!
_______________________________________________________________

4. SEARCH ENGINES: ANOTHER ADVANTAGE OF GOOGLE

Using search engines on the Web to find information is a topic
that has been discussed in previous issues of CATI:

FINDING INFORMATION ON THE WEB: USING SEARCH ENGINES
  http://traver.org/cati/archives/cati12.htm#3

FINDING INFORMATION: FAMILY-FILTERED SEARCH ENGINES
  http://traver.org/cati/archives/cati13.htm#3

SAFER SEARCHING OF THE WEB WITH GOOGLE'S SAFESEARCH
  http://traver.org/cati/archives/cati43.htm#2

As the last article mentioned, my own favorite first choice
for a general Web search engine at the moment (and the first
choice of many others) is Google.  Although not the "Editor's
Choice" of PC Magazine, Google was listed by them among their
"Top 100 Web Sites," and PC Magazine had this to say:

"Google started out as a Stanford University project designed
to find the most relevant Web pages for a search by assigning
a higher weight to those pages that have the most links to
them from other high-quality pages. Itís an excellent idea.
Google has an uncanny knack for returning extremely relevant
results. Try it just once, and youíll see how different the
search results are from those you get using other search
engines."
  http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2395176,00.html

Well, here's another advantage of Google, mentioned in the
October 16, 2000 "Internet Search" newsletter from "Dummies
Daily":

"Most search engines include the first line or two from each
page it lists so that you can get some idea of what's actually
on the page. That information can help you mentally reject any
irrelevant listings. Google goes one better by including the
stretch of text that actually contains the searched-for words,
not just the first sentence on the page."

Try it (especially using the SafeSearch feature mentioned in
the previous issue of CATI):  I think you'll like it!
_______________________________________________________________

5. SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION FOR THIS NEWSLETTER

This is the forty-fourth issue of a free newsletter devoted
to "Christians And The Internet" ("CATI," pronounced "Katy,"
but spelled with a "C" and an "I" for "Christians" and the
"Internet").

To subscribe, write to cati@traver.org, including "Subscribe
to CATI" in the Subject line and including in the body your
real name and the email address to which you wish CATI sent.

Past issues:  you'll find archives of past issues of CATI
available online at   http://traver.org/cati/.  ("It's not a
pretty site," but hopefully it may be a useful one.)
________________________________________________________________

Unless otherwise indicated, all material in this newsletter is
Copyright (C) 2000 by Barry Traver, All Rights Reserved.  For
permission to reproduce material from this newsletter, contact
Barry Traver at cati@traver.org.  Permission is hereby granted,
however, to pass along this issue to others, provided that (1)
no changes are made and (2) it is passed along in its entirety.