"Christians And The Internet" newsletter
CATI, Vol. 2, No. 14:  October 3, 2001.
_______________________________________________________________

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. MORE ON MUSIC AND/OR WORSHIP, CONTEMPORARY AND TRADITIONAL
2. WARNING!: NEW VIRUS SPREADING OVER THE INTERNET
3. SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION FOR THIS NEWSLETTER
_______________________________________________________________

Unless otherwise indicated, all material in this newsletter is
Copyright (C) 2001 by Barry Traver, All Rights Reserved.  For
permission to reproduce material from this newsletter, contact
Barry Traver at cati@traver.org.  Permission is hereby granted,
however, to pass along this issue to others, provided that (1)
no changes are made and (2) it is passed along in its entirety.
_______________________________________________________________

1. MORE ON MUSIC AND/OR WORSHIP, CONTEMPORARY AND TRADITIONAL

How shall we then praise God in song, particularly in worship?
That is an important question, but not one where there is
universal agreement, even among those who are specifically
Reformed or Presbyterian in tradition.  Here are some past
articles of CATI which dealt to some extent with questions
concerning music and/or worship:

Trinity Hymnal, Trinity Psalter: Web Resources (Part 1)
  http://traver.org/cati/archives/cati52.htm#2

Trinity Hymnal, Trinity Psalter: Web Resources (Part 2)
  http://traver.org/cati/archives/cati53.htm#2

The Legendary Phil Keaggy: "World's Greatest Guitarist"?
  http://traver.org/cati/archives/cati56.htm#1

Phil Keaggy and Contemporary Christian Music
  http://traver.org/cati/archives/cati58.htm#3

In this article, I'll be providing a list of more than eighty
interesting or helpful articles relating to this area.  You
can expect to find much with which to agree and perhaps much
with which to disagree, but I trust that you will find the
material to be worthwhile reading, especially as you find
yourself challenged to check out your ideas on music and/or
worship with the teaching of the Scriptures.

Before we go to that list of online articles, however, I
would like to follow up on the subject of "Contemporary
Christian Music" ("CCM").  In response to the articles in
CATI 2/11 and 2/13, I received this email message from a
CATI subscriber (included here with his permission):
 ______________________________
/
Barry,

Thanks for the "CCM" articles.  They have been helpful.  Our
session at River of Life (OPC) has wrestled with many of the
issues that you present.  Our worship service is what would
be called a "blended" service.

We have both Hymns and contemporary worship pieces in our
worship.  One of our elders and I go over all of the
contemporary material for lyrical content.  We want to be
sure that the songs are theologically orthodox.

Many of the songs that we sing are Scripture set to
contemporary music.  Some are hymns set to more contemporary
music. A rendition of the hymn "Alas and did my Savior bleed"
by Bob Kauflin of PDI ministries is particularly excellent.
I have found the music from PDI to be well grounded and
trustworthy.  They emphasize God's sovereignty (an aspect
lacking in so much of today's worship songs) and write from
a reformed perspective. Their music can be found at
http://www.pdinet.org/music/ .

I agree that Phil Keaggy is a great musician. I have listened
to him since I came to faith in 1980.  His "Maker of the
Universe" and "(Who will speak up for the) Little Ones" are
two of my favorites.  I would also recommend "Second Chapter
of Acts" -- the group is no longer performing, but their
material is great.  "Glad" is also a good Christian Group.
"Big Tent Revival" has some good music.  In fact, if you use
good Biblical discretion there is a plethora of good CCM
music to choose from that will encourage you to glorify
and enjoy God.

I can appreciate the fear that many Christians have over
anything "contemporary" infecting the church.  We need to be
cautious.  But we must not allow that fear to cripple us and
prevent us from experiencing God's provision of music for
the worship of His Name.  He has given us discernment.  He has
given us His Word.  With those, and being led by His Spirit,
we can worship Him freely in spirit and in truth.

In His Sovereign Hand, (and loving it!)
Pastor Bill Slack
"God made him who had no sin to be sin for us, that in him we
might become the righteousness of God." (2 Cor. 5:21)
\______________________________

As you know, some hold that only the Old Testament Psalms
should be sung in formal worship.  (This is true, for
example, of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in North
America.)  Others hold that church hymns composed later
may be sung in formal worship.  (This is the position, for
example, of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church, although
there are individual congregations within that denomination
that hold to exclusive Psalmody.)

Among those who allow for the use of church hymns in worship,
there are sometimes significant differences concerning the
use of contemporary vs. traditional music.  Note, however,
the important point made by Pastor Slack:  If you do plan
to use contemporary music (whether in formal worship or in
more informal settings), it is important to be careful that
the songs are theologically orthodox, i.e., true to what the
Bible teaches.  (Regrettably, many evangelical churches do
not take adequate care in this area.)

If I understand the exclusive Psalmody position correctly,
the idea is that only Psalms ought to be sung in formal
worship, but allowance is made for "uninspired" hymns to be
sung in other situations.  Thus we all have to come to terms
in one way or another with contemporary Christian music and
with the challenge (dare I say observable fact?) that much
modern music of the "Praise and Worship" variety tends to be
shallow when compared with the deeper understanding seen in
the great traditional hymns.

At his Coram Deo Web site ("Coram Deo" means "before the
face of God"), Dave Brown has some helpful thoughts, I
think, on the situation.  He starts off with three quotes
of interest:

"My Lord, I should be sorry if I only entertain them. I wish
to make them better." - Handel

"Next to the Word of God, the noble art of music is the
greatest treasure in the world." - Martin Luther

"A good hymn book is a wonderful companion to the Bible."
- Francis Schaeffer

  http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/3505/sermoninsong.html

Then he goes on to argue the following:
 ______________________________
/
Many traditional hymns of the Church speak of our sin and
God's wrath. They also praise God's character and attributes.
They bring conviction and repentance as they invoke a sense
of awe and wonder at God's majesty, excellency and beauty.
Many of these hymns follow a practical systematic theology of
Guilt, Grace and Gratitude.  Traditional hymns, like those of
Martin Luther, Augustus Toplady, John Newton and William
Cowper, are rich in theological content and reverence to the
awesome power and wonder of God.

Yet the "ole ones" seemingly aren't much in vogue these
days.  Much contemporary Christian music appeals to sensual
experience at the expense of also loving God with our minds.
Praise and worship music laden with saccharine sentimentality
is a serious reflection of theological anemia among our
assemblies.  Michael Horton has characterized some of this as
"Jesus, my boy friend music".  Subjective, inane experience
comes often at the expense of rightly dividing the Word.

Yet as disheartening as this is, there are some modern
Christian songs that appeal to contemporary musical tastes,
carry sound doctrinal messages and are truly God-centered
worship and praise.  Jonathan Edwards, who knew God's reality
with his head and passionately felt God's reality in the love
of his heart, is right when he says, "God glorifies Himself
toward the creatures also in two ways:  1. By appearing to...
their understanding.  2. In communicating Himself to their
hearts, and in their rejoicing and delighting in, and
enjoying, the manifestations which He makes of Himself....
God is glorified not only by His glory's being seen, but by
its being rejoiced in....  When those that see it delight in
it, God is more glorified than if they only see it.  His
glory is then received by the whole soul, both by the
understanding and by the heart."

Christian music, therefore, should be an expression of what
John Piper calls thinking truly and feeling duly.  Such music
I believe can be found in the work of such contemporary
writer/performers as Reformed troubadour Steve Camp,
balladeer Don Francisco, evangelicals Michael Card and
Dennis Jernigan, and British charismatic Graham Kendrick.
This Page seeks to explore lyrics of the music of yesteryear
and today that convey Scriptural integrity, sound doctrine
and true worship and praise."

  http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/3505/sermoninsong.html
\______________________________

We may not agree with all of Dave Brown's endorsements (I have
reservations, for example, about the "British charismatic
Graham Kendrick" and the "March for Jesus" with which he is
associated, although I do appreciate his "Knowing You," which
is based on Phil. 3:7-11), but hopefully we do agree that we
should sing only songs that "carry sound doctrinal messages
and are truly God-centered worship and praise."  We ought not
to sing any songs (traditional or contemporary) unless they
"convey Scriptural integrity, sound doctrine and true worship
and praise."

Whatever your current understanding of music and/or worship
may be, I trust that you will find the following articles
(written by evangelical Christians, many of them specifically
Reformed in perspective) to be challenging.  (And I challenge
you to find an equally valuable list of online resources on
music and/or worship elsewhere!)

IMPORTANT:  You will not find all of the articles to be
equally profitable.  Also, most of the discussions are
done in a spirit of respect or courtesy toward different
points of view, but you may find the tone of a few of the
articles to be unnecessarily abrasive or accusatory.  As
always, you should exercise Christian discernment in your
reading (and certainly should not try to read all of the
resources included here -- instead, you may want to look
through the list and sample some of the articles that
look like they may be of particular interest to you).

By the way, for some of the longer addresses, you may
find it easier to access the links by going to the online
version of this article at the following address:

CATI: More on Music and/or Worship, Contemporary and
    Traditional
  http://www.traver.org/cati/archives/cati59.htm

Online Articles

Armstrong, John H., The Mad Rush to Seeker Sensitive Worship
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr95/1995.01.JanFeb/mr9501.jha.MadRush.html

Armstrong, John H., Problems Related to Seeker-Sensitive
    Worship
  http://www.brfwitness.org/Articles/1994v29n6.htm

Bacon, Leonard Woolsey, The Hymns of Martin Luther
  http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/3505/lutherhymns.html

Brentnall, John M., John Newton on Handel's Messiah
  http://www.banneroftruth.co.uk//articles/newton_on_handels_messiah.htm

Bynum, Matt, Music and the Word (review of CMAC's Orlando 2000
    symposium)
  http://www.artsreformation.com/a001/music-the-word.html

Calvin, John, Preface to the Psalter
  http://www.fpcr.org/blue_banner_articles/calvinps.htm

Camp, Steve, A Call For Reformation in the Contemporary
    Christian Music Industry: 107 Theses
  http://www.worship.com/steve_camp_107_theses.htm

CCM World, Contemporary Christian Music: What Is It?
  http://ccmwhatisit.bizland.com/big_questions.htm

Christ Presbyterian Church, Working List of Good and Useful
    Hymns from the New Trinity Hymnal
  http://www.christpresbyterian.org/library/cpc_hymns.html

Church Music At a Crossroads (CMAC): Guidelines for Music
  http://www.musiccrossroads.org/html/guidelines_for_music.html

Comin, Douglas W., The Church's Perfect Hymn Book
  http://www.reformed.com/triangle/t_psalms.html

Cwirla, William M., The Law and the Gospel in the Liturgy
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr96/1996.01.JanFeb/mr9601.wmc.LawGospelLit.html

Dawn, Marva, Beyond Conflicts: Asking the Right Questions
    (taken from lectures by Marva Dawn)
  http://www.musiccrossroads.org/html/feature_of_the_month_06_00.html

Dawn, Marva, Not A Waste of Time (an interview with Marva
    Dawn)
  http://www.musiccrossroads.org/html/marva_dawn.html

Elliot, Elisabeth, Whatever Happened to Hymns?
  http://www.banneroftruth.co.uk//articles/whatever_happened_to_hymns.htm

Ewell, Terry, What is Christian Music? (Leadership U, Campus
    Crusade for Christ)
  http://www.leaderu.com/aip/docs/ewell.html

Food for Thought (quotations from William Hamilton, Michael
    Card, Calvin Johansson, Ken Myers, Donald Hustad, John
    Armstrong, Neil Postman)
  http://www.musiccrossroads.org/html/feature_of_the_month_10_00.html

Gilbert, Rich, Corporate Worship
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr93/1993.06.NovDec/mr9306.rg.corporate.html

Godfrey W. Robert, What Does It Mean to Praise?: A Look at
    Psalm 150
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr96/1996.01.JanFeb/mr9601.wrg.praise.html

Grant, George, Books: Hymns of the Church
  http://www.worldmag.com/world/issue/11-22-97/cultural_4.asp

Grotenhuis, Joy, Synopsis of the 3rd Annual Symposium (review
    of CMAC's Tacoma 1999 symposium)
  http://www.musiccrossroads.org/html/winter99winter__19991.html

Hart, D.G., Why Evangelicals Think They Hate Liturgy
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr96/1996.01.JanFeb/mr9601.dgh.EvangHate.html

Hart, D.G., Evangelicals on the Durham Trail
  http://www.the-highway.com/articleApr98.html

Hodge, Ian, Understanding the Rules of Music (Out of the
    Frying Pan)
  http://www.artsreformation.com/a001/ih-music-rules.html

Horton, Michael S., A Defense of Reformed Liturgy
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr96/1996.01.JanFeb/mr9601.msh.ReformedLit.html

Horton, Michael S., A Form For Divine Worship
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr96/1996.01.JanFeb/mr9601.msh.divineworship.html

Horton, Michael S., Are Your Hymns Too Spiritual?
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr95/1995.04.JulAug/mr9504.msh.TooSpiritual.html

Horton, Michael S., Contemporary and Traditional Worship
  http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/3505/hortonworship.html

Horton, Michael S., Is Style Neutral?
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr96/1996.01.JanFeb/mr9601.msh.style.html

Horton, Michael S., Preaching Christ (Part 2 of 6 on Worship)
  http://www.alliancenet.org/radio/whi/commentaries/whi.com.msh.wor2.html

Horton, Michael S., Reforming Church Music (Part 3 of 6 on
    Worship)
  http://www.alliancenet.org/radio/whi/commentaries/whi.com.msh.wor3.html

Horton, Michael S., Reforming the Church Service (Part 4 of 6
    on Worship)
  http://www.alliancenet.org/radio/whi/commentaries/whi.com.msh.wor4.html

Horton, Michael S., Reforming Worship (Part 1 of 6 on Worship)
  http://www.alliancenet.org/radio/whi/commentaries/whi.com.msh.wor1.html

Horton, Michael S., Re-thinking the Lord's Supper (Part 6 of 6
    on Worship)
  http://www.alliancenet.org/radio/whi/commentaries/whi.com.msh.wor6.html

Horton, Michael S., Revivalism and Christian Music (Part 5 of 6
    on Worship)
  http://www.alliancenet.org/radio/whi/commentaries/whi.com.msh.rev5.html

Horton, Michael S., Why a Liturgical Way of Worshipping God?
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/articles/horton.liturgy.html

Irons, Lee, Exclusive Psalmody or New Covenant Hymnody
  http://www.the-highway.com/psalmody_Irons.html

Janson, P.J., A Reason to Sing
  http://www.the-highway.com/Music_Janson.html

Johansson, Calvin M., "How Can We Sing the Lord's Song in a
    Foreign Land?": Church Music in Principle and Practice
  http://www.musiccrossroads.org/html/calvin_johansson.html

Jones, Douglas, Music as Spirit
  http://www.credenda.org/issues/11-5thema.php

Joseph, Mark, and Nancy R. Pearcey, Christians in Dialogue:
    Can popular music ever be a conduit for Christian
    values?
  http://www.nationalreview.com/weekend/culture/culture-pearcey062301.shtml

Keddie, John W., Sing the Lord's Song!: Biblical Psalms in
    Worship
  http://www.reformed.com/hazleton/Keddie.htm#(v)%20New%20Testament%20Christian%20Hymns

Ling, Samuel, Worship Music: Traditional or Contemporary?:
    Part 1
  http://www.ccmusa.org/challenger/000809/doc1.html

Ling, Samuel, Worship Music: Traditional or Contemporary?:
    Part 2
  http://www.ccmusa.org/challenger/001011/doc2.html

Linton, Michael, Apostles of Rock: The Splintered World
    of Contemporary Christian Music and At the Crossroads:
    An Insider's Look at the Past, Present, and Future of
    Contemporary Christian Music (book reviews from First
    Things)
  http://www.firstthings.com/ftissues/ft0002/reviews/linton.html

Marsden, Robert S. -- See OPC Majority Report on Song in the
    Public Worship of God

Masters, Peter, Is "New Worship" Compatible with "Traditional
    Worship"?
  http://www.freedomministries.org.uk/masters/worship1.htm

Masters, Peter, Pop-Idiom Music In Worship and Evangelism
  http://www.freedomministries.org.uk/masters/popidiom.shtml

Masters, Peter, The Psalter Is Nothing Like a Book of Choruses
  http://www.freedomministries.org.uk/masters/psalter.htm

Mays, Rich, Shouldn't worship music merely stimulate emotional
    reaction or should it actually lead us further into maturity
    and discipleship?
  http://capo.org/premise/98/july/p980705.html

Murray, John -- See OPC Minority Report on Song in the Public
    Worship of God

Myers, Ken, God Glorified...In Our Worship
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr93/1993.05.SepOct/mr9305.km.worship.html

Myers, Ken, Is "Popular Culture" Either?
  http://www.kfuo.org/articles/aissar42.htm

Myers, Ken, What Distinguishes "Popular" Culture From Other
Varieties of Culture?
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr97/1997.01.JanFeb/mr9701.km.tendencies.html

Nakhla, Anne-Marie E., A Historical Consideration of Music in
    the Bible
  http://www.musiccrossroads.org/html/feature_of_the_month_07_00.html

Nakhla, Paul, Music in the Bible
  http://www.musiccrossroads.org/html/feature_of_the_month_08_00.html

OPC Majority Report on Song in the Public Worship of God
    (Robert S. Marsden)
  http://www.gracealone.com/trinitypsalter/majorityreport.htm

OPC Minority Report on Song in the Public Worship of God (John
    Murray)
  http://www.gracealone.com/trinitypsalter/minorityreport.htm

Payton, Leonard R., Congregational Singing and the Ministry of
    the Word
  http://www.the-highway.com/articleJuly98.html

Payton, Leonard R., Glossary of Church Growth & Christian
    Contemporary Music Terminology
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr95/1995.01.JanFeb/mr9501.lrp.glossary.html

Payton, Leonard R., Is It a Prelude or a Quaalude?
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr95/1995.01.JanFeb/mr9501.lrp.prelude.html

Payton, Leonard R., Reforming Worship Music
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr94/1994.02.MarApr/mr9402.lrp.RefMusic.html

Payton, Leonard R., The Pride of Simplicity
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr95/1995.04.JulAug/mr9504.lrp.simplicity.html

PCA Worship Guidelines for MNA Sponsored Church Planters
  http://www.pcanet.org/mna/Worship%20Guidelines%20for%20MNA%20Sponsored%20Church%20Planters.htm

Pipa, Joseph, Review of John Frame's Worship in Spirit and
    Truth
  http://presbyteriannews.org/volumes/v2/4/pipa7.htm

Piper, John, Singing and Making Melody to the Lord
  http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/3505/pipermusic.html

Rayburn, Robert S., The Liturgical Authority of the Old
    Testament
  http://www.musiccrossroads.org/html/feature_of_the_month_09_00.html

Reed, Kevin, Presbyterian Worship: Old and New: A Review and
    Commentary upon Worship in Spirit and Truth, a book by John
    Frame
  http://www.all-of-grace.org/pub/others/regulativeprinciple.html

Rees, Stephen, What Shall We Sing?
  http://www.banneroftruth.co.uk/articles/what_shall_we_sing.htm

Richards, Neil C., The Place of Music in Worship
  http://www.banneroftruth.co.uk//articles/place_of_music_in_worship.htm

Ritchie, Rick, Avoiding the Trail From Clap Clap to Claptrap:
    Why should those who are trying to promote reformation in
    our day be so devoted to liturgy?
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr96/1996.01.JanFeb/mr9601.rjr.clapclap.html

Rosenthal, Shane, Recommended Sacred Music
  http://www.markers.com/ink/srclassicmusic.htm

Saternos, Casimir, Singing as a Symbol of Christian Unity
  http://www.artsreformation.com/a001/cs-singing-unity.html

Schwertley, Brian, The Neo-Presbyterian Challenge to
    Confessional Presbyterian Orthodoxy: A Biblical Analysis
    of John Frame’s Worship in Spirit and in Truth
  http://www.reformed.com/pub/frame.htm

Schwertley, Brian, A Brief Examination of Exclusive Psalmody
  http://www.reformed.com/pub/psalms.htm

Solomon, Jerry, Music and the Christian
  http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/3505/music.html

Solomon, Jerry, Worship (Leadership U, Campus Crusade for Christ)
  http://www.leaderu.com/orgs/probe/docs/worship.html

Swanson, Kevin, Vain Repetition
  http://www.artsreformation.com/a001/ks-repetition.html

Thackway, J.B., A review of John Frame's Contemporary Worship
    Music
  http://homepages.enterprise.net/smackay/blq/cwm.html

Thomas, Geoff, Church Music at a Crossroads Conference (review
    of CMAC's 1999 Tacoma symposium)
  http://www.banneroftruth.co.uk/articles/church_music_at_a_crossroads.htm

Thomas, Geoff, Contemporary Worship Music: a Biblical Defense
    (book review of John Frame's Contemporary Worship Music)
  http://www.banneroftruth.co.uk/articles/contemporary_worship_music.htm

Thomas, Geoff, The Decline of Hymn-Singing on the Incarnation
  http://www.banneroftruth.co.uk//articles/decline_of_hymn_singing.htm

Thomas, Geoff, John Frame on Worship (book review of John
    Frame's Worship in Spirit and Truth)
  http://www.banneroftruth.co.uk/articles/john_frame_on_worship.htm

Thomas, Geoff, The Sound of Music
  http://www.banneroftruth.co.uk/articles/the_sound_of_music.htm

Thomas, Geoff, The Tired Old Subject of Worship
  http://www.banneroftruth.co.uk/articles/tired_old_subject_of_worship.htm

Third Millennium Ministries: Worship Resources (check
    "Theology" or "Questions & Answers" for comments on
     worship and/or music)
  http://www.thirdmill.org/worship_frameset.asp

Townsend, Peter, Review of John Frame's Contemporary Worship
    Music
  http://www.calvin.edu/worship/bookshlf/reviews/rev52b.htm

Veith, Gene Edward, Christianity & Culture: God's Double
    Sovereignty
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr97/1997.01.JanFeb/mr9701.gev.christianity.html

Veith, Gene Edward, The Reformation and the Arts
  http://www.alliancenet.org/pub/mr/mr94/1994.06.NovDec/mr9406.gev.RefArts.html

Williamson, G.I., The Singing of Psalms in the Worship of God
  http://www.reformed.com/triangle/t_giwill.html

Williamson, G.I., Trinity Hymnal, or The Content of the Book
    of Praise in the Orthodox Presbyterian Church: Part I
  http://trueworship.netfirms.com/Singpsalms.dir/williamson/hymnal1.html

Williamson, G.I., Trinity Hymnal, or The Content of the Book
    of Praise in the Orthodox Presbyterian Church: Part II
  http://trueworship.netfirms.com/Singpsalms.dir/williamson/hymnal2.html

Wilson, Douglas, Anthems of Conquest
  http://www.credenda.org/issues/11-2presbyterion.php

Wilson, Douglas, Worship Music and Propriety
  http://www.credenda.org/issues/11-5presbyterion.php

Wilson, Monte, Classical Propositions for Pop Churches
  http://users.hunterlink.net.au/~derjn/wfs3d.html

Wilson, Monte, Church-O-Rama Or Corporate Worship?
  http://www.the-highway.com/church_Wilson.html

Wilson, Monte, Narcissism Goes to Church: Encountering
    Evangelical Worship
  http://www.chalcedon.edu/report/98oct/Wilson_Narcissism.html

Woetzel, Kurt, An Important Question for our Times:
    Is Music Moral?
  http://www.majestymusic.com/inchoir/display.asp?pageid=musicmoral

Yount, Laura, Seeker Worship - "Sanctified" Bait and Switch
  http://www.musiccrossroads.org/html/feature_of_the_month__04_01.html

Yount, Terry, Up for Review...Measuring the Music by John
    Makujina
  http://www.musiccrossroads.org/html/feature_of_the_month.html

Enjoy!
_______________________________________________________________

2. WARNING!: NEW VIRUS SPREADING OVER THE INTERNET

In case you haven't already heard about it, here is a warning
of a newly discovered virus spreading over the Internet:
 ______________________________
/
Subject:  Warning!  Warning!  Watch OUT!

***********************************************
WARNING, CAUTION, DANGER, AND BEWARE!
Gullibility Virus Spreading over the Internet!
***********************************************

WASHINGTON, D.C.--The Institute for the Investigation of
Irregular Internet  Phenomena announced today that many
Internet users are becoming  infected by a new virus that
causes them to believe without question every groundless
story, legend, and dire warning that shows up in their inbox
or on their browser.  The Gullibility Virus, as it is called,
apparently makes people believe and forward copies of silly
hoaxes relating to cookie recipes, email viruses, taxes on
modems, and get-rich-quick schemes.

"These are not just readers of tabloids or people who buy
lottery tickets  based on fortune cookie numbers," a spokesman
said.  "Most are  otherwise normal people, who would laugh at
the same stories if told to  them by a stranger on a street
corner."  However, once these same people  become infected
with the Gullibility Virus, they believe anything they read
on the Internet.

"My immunity to tall tales and bizarre claims is all gone,"
reported one  weeping victim.  "I believe every warning
message and sick child story my  friends forward to me, even
though most of the messages are anonymous."

Another victim, now in remission, added, "When I first heard
about 'Good  Times,' I just accepted it without question.
After all, there were dozens of other recipients on the mail
header, so I thought the virus must be true."  It was a
long time, the victim said, before she could stand up at a
Hoaxees Anonymous meeting and state, "My name is Jane, and
I've been hoaxed."   Now, however, she is spreading the word.
"Challenge and check whatever  you read," she says.

Internet users are urged to examine themselves for symptoms
of the virus,  which include the following:

* The willingness to believe improbable stories without thinking.

* The urge to forward multiple copies of such stories to
others.

* A lack of desire to take three minutes to check to see if a
story is true.

T.C. is an example of someone recently infected.  He told one
reporter, "I  read on the Net that the major ingredient in
almost all shampoos makes  your hair fall out, so I've stopped
using shampoo."  When told about the  Gullibility Virus, T.C.
said he would stop reading email, so that he would not become
infected.

Anyone with symptoms like these is urged to seek help
immediately.   Experts recommend that at the first feelings
of gullibility, Internet users rush to their favorite search
engine and look up the item tempting them to thoughtless
credence.  Most hoaxes, legends, and tall tales have been
widely discussed and exposed by the Internet community.

Courses in critical thinking are also widely available, and
there is online help from many sources, including

CIAC Hoax Pages (Computer Incident Advisory Capability) at
  http://hoaxbusters.ciac.org/

Symantec Anti Virus Research Center at
  http://www.symantec.com/avcenter/

McAfee Associates Virus Hoax List at
  http://vil.mcafee.com/hoax.asp?

The Urban Legends Web Site at
  http://www.urbanlegends.com

Urban Legends Reference Pages at
  http://www.snopes.com

Datafellows Hoax Warnings at
  http://www.Europe.Datafellows.com/news/hoax.htm

Those people who are still symptom free can help inoculate
themselves  against the Gullibility Virus by reading some good
material on evaluating  sources, such as

Evaluating Internet Research Sources at
  http://www.virtualsalt.com/evalu8it.htm

Evaluation of Information Sources at
  http://www.vuw.ac.nz/~agsmith/evaln/evaln.htm

Bibliography on Evaluating Internet Resources at
  http://www.lib.vt.edu/research/libinst/evalbiblio.html

Lastly, as a public service, Internet users can help stamp out
the Gullibility  Virus by sending copies of this message to
anyone who forwards them a  hoax.

***********************************************
This message is so important, we're sending it anonymously!
Forward it to all your friends right away!  Don't think about
it!  This is not a chain letter!  This story is true!  Don't
check it out!  This story is so timely, there is no date
on it!  This story is so important, we're using lots of
exclamation  points!  Lots!!  For every message you forward
to some unsuspecting person, the Home for the Hopelessly
Gullible will donate ten cents to itself.   (If you wonder
how the Home will know you are forwarding these messages all
over creation, you're obviously thinking too much.)
***********************************************
ACT NOW!  DON'T DELAY!  LIMITED TIME ONLY!  NOT SOLD IN
ANY  STORE!
\______________________________________________________________

I have seen this warning in several different variations.  The
version I include here I found at the following URL (except
that I updated the broken links):

  http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/blvirus.htm

If a friend sends you a virus warning that you believe to be a
hoax, you may want to send him or her a copy of this warning
about the "Gullibility Virus" (but do so only if you know that
your friend has a good sense of humor!).
_______________________________________________________________

3. SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION FOR THIS NEWSLETTER

This is the fifty-ninth issue of a free newsletter devoted
to Christians And The Internet ("CATI," pronounced "Katy,"
but spelled with a "C" and an "I" for "Christians" and the
"Internet").

To subscribe, write to cati@traver.org, including the word
"Subscribe" in the Subject line and including in the body your
real name and the email address to which you wish CATI sent.

Past issues:  you'll find archives of past issues of CATI
available online at   http://traver.org/cati/.  ("It's not a
pretty site," but hopefully it may be a useful one.)
________________________________________________________________

Unless otherwise indicated, all material in this newsletter is
Copyright (C) 2001 by Barry Traver, All Rights Reserved.  For
permission to reproduce material from this newsletter, contact
Barry Traver at cati@traver.org.  Permission is hereby granted,
however, to pass along this issue to others, provided that (1)
no changes are made and (2) it is passed along in its entirety.
_______________________________________________________________