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"Christians And The Internet" newsletter
CATI, Vol. 4 No. 3:  September 1, 2003
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. COMMENTS FROM THE EDITOR ABOUT "CATI 80"
2. PRICELESS SOFTWARE:  SOFTWARE WITHOUT MONEY OR PRICE!
3. "REFORMED" WEB SITES:  A LIST OF LOTS OF LINKS
4. "NOT AUTHORIZED TO INCLUDE A LINK" IN CATI??
5. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: INFORMATION ON CATI NEWSLETTER
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The latest revision of this issue of "CATI" can be accessed
on-line at http://traver.org/cati/archives/cati80.htm.  The
Web page edition makes it especially easy to visit the links.

Unless otherwise indicated, all material in this newsletter is
Copyright (C) 2003 by Barry Traver, All Rights Reserved.  See
the end of this issue for more information on "CATI."
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1. COMMENTS FROM THE EDITOR ABOUT "CATI 80."

Each issue of "CATI" usually contains these (or some similar)
comments:

"Like to know what this is?  This is the eightieth issue of
a free newsletter devoted to "Christians And The Internet"
("CATI," pronounced "Katy," but spelled with a "C" and an "I"
for "Christians" and the "Internet").

So, in spite of the fact that the Traver family recently
added a cat (a five-year old spayed Abyssinian female) to
the household, "CATI" is NOT pronounced "catty," but "Katy."
(If you've been mispronouncing it, take heart, because now
you are in a position to correct others who mispronounce
it!)

It's hard to believe, but what "CATI 80" means (in addition
to making a nice rhyme) is that eighty issues of "CATI" have
now been published, since the newsletter was started back at
the beginning of 2000.

In spite of the fact that you'll find information here that
it is difficult or impossible to find elsewhere (such as the
NAPARC directory of churches published in 2000, a revised
version of which is now being worked on), the existence of
"CATI" is in general a well-kept secret.

Anyone who is interested is welcome to subscribe.  You do not
have to be "Presbyterian" or "Reformed," even though articles
are written from that perspective.  In fact, you do not even
have to be a "Christian":  those who are not should still find
some articles to be of interest or of value.  (The newsletter
is, however, of course written from a Christian perspective.)

Your interest in "CATI" is appreciated.  I receive no income
from "CATI" (it is a labor of love), and my reward is knowing
that some people are apparently finding "CATI" to be helpful
and/or enjoyable.  Feel free to write to me at cati@traver.org
with questions or suggestions.  And feel free to let your
friends know about "CATI" (pronounced "KATY," but spelled with
a "C" and an "I") so that they too will have an opportunity to
subscribe!

P.S.  If you have not already done so, why not visit the new
"CATI" bulletin board?  This will get you there:

  http://traver.org/cati/bb/

Enjoy!
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2. PRICELESS SOFTWARE:  SOFTWARE WITHOUT MONEY OR PRICE!

Those who wish to be good stewards under God of their money
should be happy to know that much free software (or "freeware")
on the Internet is as good as (and occasionally better than)
software that costs money.

You'll find the following Web site to be a good resource in
this area:

Pricelessware
  http://www.pricelessware.org/

Here you'll find "the best of the best in Windows© Freeware,
as determined by the readers of alt.comp.freeware," a Usenet
newsgroup devoted to the topic of freeware.

The policy of the site is NOT to include any software which is
spyware or adware, types of software they do not consider to
be genuine freeware.

The freeware on their site is divided into the following
categories:

  BUSINESS
  DESKTOP
  FILE UTILITIES
  GRAPHICS
  INTERNET
  MULTIMEDIA
  ORGANIZERS
  SECURITY
  SHELL
  SYSTEM UTILITIES
  TEXT
  WEB DESIGN

Not all of the programs will be useful to all CATI readers,
but you should find at least some to be helpful and some
perhaps to be invaluable, even though there's no cost.  (Thus
the software may be "priceless" in more than one sense.)

Here are some programs in particular in which you may have a
possible interest:

  BUSINESS
    Open Office (MS-compatible office suite, but free!)
  DESKTOP
    AI RoboForm (Web form filler, auto-completer)
    e-Sword (Bible program, including NASB and The Message)
  FILE UTILITIES
    2xExplorer (dual pane file manager)
    PowerDesk (single or dual pane file manager)
  GRAPHICS
    Infanview (viewer and file converter)
  INTERNET
    OffByOne (small browser)
    Xenu's Link Sleuth (URL checker-validator)
    Webwasher (Web content filter)
    Google Toolbar (Web search tool)
  MULTIMEDIA
    Winamp Classic (audio player)
  ORGANIZERS
    Treepad Light (note organizer)
  SECURITY
    Ad-Aware (anti-spyware tool)
    Spybot Search & Destroy (anti-spyware tool)
    AVG (anti-virus system)
  SHELL
    Avant (Web browser)
  SYSTEM UTILITIES
     CDCheck (CD tool for error detection)
  TEXT
    ExamDiff (compare text in files)
    ReadPlease (convert text to speech)
    MetaPad (replacement for Notepad)
    EditPad Lite (replacement for Notepad)
  WEB DESIGN
    Text2Web (convert text to HTML)
    Arachnophilia (HTML editor)

And that's just a sampling of what you'll find on the site, and
all of it is free!
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3. "REFORMED" WEB SITES:  A LIST OF LOTS OF LINKS

Reformed Web Sites
  http://www.covenant-urc.org/links/refwebs.html

If you're looking for Reformed Web sites (i.e., conservative
Christian Web sites that are in the Reformed or Presbyterian
tradition), this list of links is an excellent place to begin.
Part of the Web site of the Covenant United Reformed Church
of Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, this is one of the largest and
most useful such lists on the Web.

Please, however, note this caution:

"This listing of Web sites and Reformed Internet discussion
groups is supplied for the convenience of those wishing to
learn more about the Reformed faith.   While all these links
have value as far as learning more about the Reformed faith,
we do not agree with everything taught at some of them.  All
those making use of these links should use discretion and,
like the Bereans (Acts 17:11), compare everything taught in
them against the Scriptures.  The listing of any link here
should not be considered to be an endorsement by us of that
organization or its teachings."
  http://www.covenant-urc.org/links.html

I would echo that caution (more about "Internet discussion
groups" in a moment), especially since annotations are sparse
on the list, but if you use some "sanctified common sense" in
your traveling, you will find some rich resources (whether or
not you consider yourself to be "Reformed")!

"Reformed Web Sites" are divided into the following categories:
"Reformed Denominations and Church Associations," "Reformed
Congregations," "Reformed Publishers and Booksellers," and
"Other Reformed Web Sites."  There is also a category entitled
"Other Web Sites of Interest," and most of these sites are also
Christian in orientation (although not necessarily Reformed).

In addition to a list of Reformed Web sites, also available is
a large list of Reformed Internet discussion groups.

Here's the site's description of what that's all about:

"Reformed Internet discussion groups (also called e-mail
conferences, mailing lists, message boards, and listserves)
allow people to ask questions, exchange opinions, and discuss
various aspects of the Reformed faith.  Most of these
conferences rely on e-mail messages sent out from a computer
server to a group of people on its subscription list.  Hence,
the names 'listserve,' 'mailing list', and 'list.'

"A few Reformed Internet discussion groups are Web-based, but
most of them rely on e-mail listserve technology to distribute
messages to every one of the group's participants.  In an
e-mail conference, someone may want to write something about
some topic.  If that person is a subscriber to a listserver
devoted to that topic, that person can write his or her
message as an e-mail message and then send that  message to
the computer handling that subscription list. That listserver
computer receiving the message then forwards copies to everyone
on its list.  The recipients of that message are free to send
replies through the listserver to everyone else on the list...."
  http://www.covenant-urc.org/links/lists.html

Most people are familiar with the benefits of Web sites, but
what do Internet discussion groups have to offer?

"...Much can be learned about the Reformed faith simply by
'lurking' and reading other peoples' messages.  Those who wish
to can join in the discussions.  Reformed Internet discussion
groups also allow those with questions about anything related
to the Reformed faith to ask their questions and receive
assistance."
  http://www.covenant-urc.org/links/lists.html

The list of "Reformed Internet discussion groups" is annotated,
with a full paragraph description of each group.  As I said
earlier, the list of "Reformed Web Sites" is sparsely annotated
(but the compiler does indicate which sites are "NEW!" to the
list).  Even so, you should find that list of "Reformed Web
Sites" to be a treasury of rich resources!
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4. "NOT AUTHORIZED TO INCLUDE A LINK" IN CATI??

I recently received this communication:

> You are not authorized to include a link or any other
> information regarding [us] on your website(s)....
> Please reply to this email for authorization, or remove any
> and all links to [us] from your web site(s).

Here, in part, is my response:
 _________________________________________________
/
The phrase "You are not authorized to include a link"
goes beyond what is the general understanding of the legal
situation concerning links.  For normal links, such permission
or "authorization" is by most authorities NOT considered to be
required.  There is not complete unanimity in this area, but I
believe that my practice is in line with the general consensus
regarding normal links (such as those in CATI).

For example, Tim Berners-Lee, who is the real founder of the
Internet (contrary to what Al Gore may claim <grin>), says
this:

"The ability to refer to a document (or a person or any thing
else) is in general a fundamental right of free speech to the
same extent that speech is free. Making the reference with a
hypertext link is more efficient but changes nothing else.
When the 'speech' itself is illegal, whether or not it contains
hypertext links, then its illegality should not be affected by
the fact that it is in electronic form.  Users and information
providers and lawyers have to share this convention. If they
do not, people will be frightened to make links for fear of
legal implications.  I received a mail message asking for
"permission" to link to our site.  I refused as I insisted that
permission was not needed.  There is no reason to have to ask
before making a link to another site.

"There are some fundamental principles about links on which the
Web is based.  These principles allow the world of distributed
hypertext to work.  Lawyers, users and technology and content
providers must all agree to respect these principles which
have been outlined.  It is difficult to emphasize how important
these issues are for society. The first amendment to the
Constitution of the United States, for example, addresses the
right to speak.  The right to make reference to something is
inherent in that right.  On the web, to make reference without
making a link is possible but ineffective - like speaking but
with a paper bag over your head."

  http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkMyths.html

Although the preceding is personal opinion and does not
necessarily reflect official W3C policy, note that it is
posted on the Web site of the World Wide Web Consortium.

Here are one law firm's comments on the question concerning
the legality of normal links:

"So now for clarity let us redefine the question as "may I
freely set up HREF links in my web site, to the web sites of
others?"  As will be clear in a moment, the short answer to
that question is "yes".  (Except in the case of framing....)

"The general rule proposed and set forth here, that one may
freely set up non-framed HREF links to the web sites of others,
is a rather reassuring rule since it happens to comport well
with common practice and with common sense. The designers of
the World Wide Web intended that it would be precisely that --
a web. One of the hopes and goals of the designers was that
after the passage of some years, a meaningful fraction of the
sum total of human knowledge would be on the Web, and that it
would be fully cross-linked. The idea was that while you might
not find the answer to your question on the first web page you
encountered, after a few rodent movements you would find the
answer, as one web page led you to another, and another,
eventually finding your answer.  Such a result -- a web of
knowledge -- is only possible if people feel free to set up any
and all HREF links that might come to mind. A person who
steadfastly objects to any and all HREF links to his or her web
site is missing the point of the World Wide Web.

  http://www.patents.com/weblaw.sht

Even "deep linking" has been declared not to be illegal:

"Deep linking has an official seal of approval now that U.S.
District Judge Harry Hupp has ruled that websites can legally
provide links to any pages on all other sites....  Deep links
... typically bypass the front page of a website....  Hupp said
deep linking is not illegal as long as it's clear whom the
linked page belongs to."

  http://www.wired.com/news/politics/0,1283,35306,00.html

Framing, inlining, and inciting to illegal activity (such as
violating of copyright) are not being defended here, but such
things are in a far different category from normal linking, the
right to which seems to be implied in the right to free speech.
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5. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: INFORMATION ON CATI NEWSLETTER

Like to know what this is?  This is the eightieth issue of
a free newsletter devoted to "Christians And The Internet"
("CATI," pronounced "Katy," but spelled with a "C" and an "I"
for "Christians" and the "Internet").

Like to subscribe to this free email newsletter?  Just send an
email to subscribe@cati.org (but be sure to include your name
in the note).

Like to read past CATI issues and articles (or even search
CATI for a particular subject)?  Go to http://cati.org and
you'll find an archive of past issues (arranged in reverse
chronological order), a partial (but rather dated) index of
articles (arranged alphabetically by topic), and a search
engine specifically for use with CATI.

Like to pass along this issue to others?  You may.  Permission
is hereby granted to pass along any issue of CATI to someone
else, provided that it is passed along in its entirety with no
changes made.  (For now, I prefer that you send the complete
issue, although I may in the near future provide guidelines
for passing along individual articles.)

Like to use material from this newsletter (say, on a Web page
or in a publication)?  For permission to do that, send a note
to cati@traver.org (explaining what you'd like to use and for
what purpose).  Reasonable requests are usually granted.

Like to unsubscribe?  That's also easy.  Just send an email to
unsubscribe@cati.org (but if you decide to unsubscribe, you'll
be missed, so any thoughts about the newsletter that you would
be willing to share at that time would be much appreciated).

Like to tell your friends about CATI?  That is not only much
encouraged, but also an encouragement to the editor!  CATI is
a lot of work (albeit a labor of love) and (since it is a free
newsletter and I intend it to stay such) provides no financial
income, so what keeps me going with this personal endeavor is
knowing that people are finding it to be helpful, instructive,
and enjoyable.  (Comments from readers are always welcome, so
let me hear from you!)

Unless otherwise indicated, all material in this newsletter is
Copyright (C) 2003 by Barry Traver, All Rights Reserved.
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