"Christians And The Internet" newsletter
CATI, Vol. 4 No. 4:  September 6, 2003
_______________________________________________________________

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. SOME CHRISTIAN WEB SITES: PART ONE (A - M)
2. SAMUEL MILLER AND THE "OLD PRINCETON" THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
3. CHRISTIAN COMPUTING MAGAZINE'S "SAFE SURFING" WEB PAGE
4. "NOT AUTHORIZED TO INCLUDE A LINK" IN CATI??: PART TWO
5. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: INFORMATION ON CATI NEWSLETTER
_______________________________________________________________

The latest revision of this issue of "CATI" can be accessed
on-line at http://traver.org/cati/archives/cati80.htm.  The
Web page edition makes it especially easy to visit the links.

Unless otherwise indicated, all material in this newsletter is
Copyright (C) 2003 by Barry Traver, All Rights Reserved.  See
the end of this issue for more information on "CATI."
_______________________________________________________________

1. SOME CHRISTIAN WEB SITES: PART ONE (A - M)

Following you'll find in alphabetical order a list of some
Christian Web sites,  some of which you may like to check out
further. Some of the sites on the list are "Reformed" in
perspective; others are more broadly evangelical in viewpoint.

Obviously, this list is not a complete list of Christian Web
sites, nor does inclusion of a particular Web site on the list
necessarily imply full endorsement of that site. You should,
however, find some here that you will find profitable and/or
interesting. Each has something special to offer. Enjoy!

All of the links have been updated and checked, and all of
them were working on September 4, 2003.  Please let me know if
any links become "broken."  Thanks!

A 21st Century Puritanism
  http://www.planetkc.com/puritan/


Abate Not: Reformed Christian Resources
  http://members.aol.com/mariostz/christian/


Abortion and the Christian by John Jefferson Davis
  http://tinyurl.com/mgaj

Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals
  http://www.christianity.com/ace

American Association of Christian Schools
  http://www.aacs.org/

American Center for Law and Justice
  http://www.aclj.org/

American Family Association (AFA Online) (Donald E. Wildmon)
  http://www.afa.net

American Tract Society
  http://www.gospelcom.net/ats/

American Vision
  http://www.americanvision.org/

Andre Kole
  http://www.andrekole.org/

Antithesis
  http://www.reformed.org/webfiles/antithesis/

ApologetiX (That Christian Parody Band)
  http://www.apologetix.com/

Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church (ARP)
  http://www.arpsynod.org/

Association of Classical and Christian Schools
  http://www.accsedu.org/

Audio Bible (KJV)
  http://www.audio-bible.com/bible/bible.html

Awesome Christian Sites (CrossDaily.com)
  http://awesome.crossdaily.com/


Bahnsen Theological Seminary (BTS)
  http://www.scccs.org/bts/

Baker Book House
  http://www.bakerbooks.com/

The Banner of Truth
  http://www.banneroftruth.co.uk/

Best of the Christian Web
  http://www.botcw.com/

Bethany Christian Services
  http://www.bethany.org/

Bible Gateway
  http://bible.gospelcom.net/bible?

Bible League
  http://www.bibleleague.org/

Bible Study Hour (James Montgomery Boice)
  http://www.alliancenet.org/radio/bsh/bsh.html

Bible Study Tools (Crosswalk.com)
  http://www.biblestudytools.net/

Billy Graham Evangelistic Association
  http://billygraham.org

Blue Letter Bible
  http://www.blueletterbible.org/

Books & Culture
  http://www.christianity.net/bc/current/

Boston Homepage (Thomas Boston)
  http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Den/1548/index.html

BreakPoint Online (Charles Colson)
  http://www.breakpoint.org/


C.H. Spurgeon: An Audio Archive
  http://www.mountzion.org/spurgeon.html

C.S. Lewis and the Inklings
  http://personal.bgsu.edu/~edwards/lewis.html

C.S. Lewis: 20th Century Christian Knight
  http://ic.net/~erasmus/RAZ26.HTM

Calvinist Cadet Corps
  http://www.gospelcom.net/cadets/

Campus Crusade for Christ
  http://www.ccci.org/

Campus Life
  http://www.christianitytoday.com/teens/

CCM Magazine (Contemporary Christian Music)
  http://www.ccmcom.com/

Center for Reformed Theology and Apologetics (CRTA)
  http://www.reformed.org/

Center for the Advancement of Paleo Orthodoxy (CAPO)
  http://capo.org/

Central Ideas in the Development of American Journalism by Marvin Olasky
  http://www.worldmag.com/world/olasky/centralideas/index.html

CHAIM (Christians Announcing Israel's Messiah)
  http://www.chaim.org/

Chalcedon Report
  http://www.chalcedonreport.com/

Children's Ministry International, Inc.
  http://www.childministry.com/

Christ College
  http://www.christcollege.org/

Christian Answers Network (ChristianAnswers.net)
  http://www.ChristianAnswers.net/canhome.html

Christian Book Distributors (Christianbook.com; CBD)
  http://www.chrbook.com/

Christian Classics Ethereal Library
  http://www.ccel.org/

Christian Coalition of America
  http://www.cc.org/

Christian Computing Magazine
  http://www.ccmag.com/

Christian Copyright Licensing International (CCLI)
  http://www.ccli.com/

Christian Counseling & Educational Foundation (CCEF)
  http://www.ccef.org/

Christian Financial Planning Institute
  http://www.christianfpi.org/

Christian Freedom International (CFI)
  http://www.christianfreedom.org/

Christian Home & School
  http://community.gospelcom.net/Brix?pageID=2869

Christian Homeschool Forum on CIN (Christian Interactive Network)
  http://www.gocin.com/homeschool/

Christian Parenting Today
  http://www.christianity.net/cpt/current/

Christian Reader
  http://www.christianity.net/cr/current/

Christian Scholar's Review
  http://www.hope.edu/resources/csr/

Christian Schools International
  http://www.gospelcom.net/csi/

A Christian Thinktank
  http://www.christian-thinktank.com/

Christianbook.com (Christian Book Distributors; CBD)
  http://www.chrbook.com/

Christianity Today
  http://www.christianitytoday.com/

Christians United for Reformation (CURE)
  http://capo.org/cure/cure.html

ChristianTeens.Net
  http://www.christianteens.net/

Classical Christian Homeschooling
  http://www.classicalhomeschooling.org/

Concerned Women for America
  http://www.cwfa.org/

Contra Mundum
  http://www.visi.com/~contra_m/cm/

Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church (D. James Kennedy)
  http://www.crpc.org/

Council for Christian Colleges & Universities
  http://www.cccu.org/

Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood (CBMW)
  http://www.cbmw.org/

Covenant College
  http://www.covenant.edu/

Covenant Media Foundation
  http://www.cmfnow.com/

Covenant Seminary
  http://www.covenantseminary.edu/

Covenant United Reformed Church: Links
  http://www.covenant-urc.org/links.html

Credenda Agenda
  http://www.credenda.org/

CrossSearch.com Resource Directory
  http://www.crosssearch.com/

Crosswalk.com
  http://www.crosswalk.com/

Crown & Covenant Publications
  http://www.psalms4u.com/

Crown Financial Ministries
  http://www.crown.org/

Cumberland Valley Bible Book Service
  http://www.cvbbs.com/

Cyber Hymnal
  http://www.cyberhymnal.org/


Desiring God Ministries (John Piper)
  http://www.desiringgod.org/

The Discerning Reader
  http://www.discerningreader.com/

DiscipleMakers
  http://www.dm.org/

Dordt College
  http://www.dordt.edu/


Echo Hills Christian Study Center (Jack Kinneer)
  http://www.wso.net/echohills/index.htm

Ephesians Four Group (E4 Group)
  http://www.freebiblesoftware.com/

Escondido Tutorial Service
  http://www.gbt.org/


Family Research Council
  http://www.frc.org/

Farese.com
  http://farese.com/

Favorite Hymns
  http://www.planetkc.com/puritan/Hymns/hymns.htm

Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA)

  http://www.fca.org/

Fellowship of Christian Magicians
  http://www.gospelcom.net/fcm/

Fire and Ice: Puritan and Reformed Writings
  http://www.puritansermons.com/

Focus on the Family
  http://www.fotf.org/


Gateway to Joy (Elizabeth Elliot)

  http://www.gospelcom.net/bttb/listen/gwtj/

Geneva College
  http://www.geneva.edu/

Gideons International
  http://www.gideons.org/

Global Journal of Classical Theology
  http://www.trinitysem.edu/journal/journalmain.html

Gospel Communications Network
  http://www.gospelcom.net/

Gospel Communications International
  http://www.gospelcom.net/gf/

Grace to You (John MacArthur)
  http://www.gty.org/

Great Commission Publications
  http://www.gcp.org/

Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
  http://www.gpts.edu/

A Guide to Christian Literature on the Internet (Pointing the Way)
  http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/christian-books.html

A Guide to Christian Resources on the Internet (Not Just Bibles)
  http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/christian-resources.html


Hall of Church History
  http://www.gty.org/~phil/hall.htm

The Highway
  http://www.the-highway.com.

Hollywood Jesus
  http://www.hollywoodjesus.com/

Home School Digest (Wisdom's Gate)
  http://www.homeschooldigest.com/hsd.htm

Home School Legal Defense Association (Mike Farris)
  http://www.hslda.org/

HomeSchool Channel (Mike Farris at Crosswalk.com)
  http://homeschool.crosswalk.com/

Homeschool World (Mary Pride)
  http://www.home-school.com/

Homeschooling Today
  http://www.homeschooltoday.com/home.htm


I.C.E. FreeBooks
  http://www.freebooks.com/

Institute for Biblical Counseling and Discipleship (IBCD)
  http://www.ibcd.org/

Institute for Creation Research (ICR)
  http://www.icr.org/

Institutes of the Christian Religion by John Calvin
  http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/ipb-e/epl-cvinst.html
    or
Institutes of the Christian Religion by John Calvin
    (with Introduction by John Murray)
  http://www.ccel.org/c/calvin/institutes/institutes.html

International Bible Society
  http://www.gospelcom.net/ibs/

International Christian Concern
  http://www.persecution.org/

International Day of Prayer for the Persecuted Church
  http://www.persecutedchurch.org/

International Fellowship of Evangelical Students (IFES)
  http://www.ifesworld.org/

Internet for Christians (Quentin J. Schultze)
  http://www.gospelcom.net/ifc/

InterVarsity Christian Fellowship
  http://www.gospelcom.net/iv/

Into the Wardrobe (C.S. Lewis)
  http://cslewis.DrZeus.net/


James Ward Music
  http://www.jameswardmusic.com/

Jews for Jesus
  http://www.jewsforjesus.org/

John Newton
  http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Pointe/4495/index2.html

John Owen: Puritan Prince of the Divines
  http://www.theocentric.com/johnowen/

JonathanEdwards.com
  http://www.jonathanedwards.com/

Journal of Biblical Ethics in Medicine
  http://capo.org/jbem/intro_pa.htm

Judy Rogers
  http://www.judyrogers.com/

Just for Catholics (Joe Mizzi)
  http://www.justforcatholics.org/

Just Moms
  http://www.justmoms.com/


Kid's Corner
  http://www.gospelcom.net/gci/kc/

King's Meadow Study Center (George Grant)
  http://capo.org/kmsc/index.htm

Knox Theological Seminary
  http://www.knoxseminary.org/


L'Abri Fellowship (Switzerland)
  http://www.labri.org/

Layman Online (Presbyterian Layman, PCUSA)
  http://www.layman.org/

Leadership Journal
  http://www.christianitytoday.com/leaders/

Ligonier Ministries (Renewing Your Mind with R.C. Sproul)
  http://www.gospelcom.net/ligonier/

Logos Research Systems, Inc.
  http://www.logos.com/


Marriage (Marriage Partnership)
  http://www.christianity.net/mp/current/

Men of Integrity
  http://www3.christianity.net/menofintegrity/

Michael Card
  http://michaelcard.com/

Mid-America Reformed Seminary
  http://www.midamerica.edu/

Middle East Reformed Fellowship (MERF)
  http://www.merf.org/

Modern Reformation
  http://tinyurl.com/mgaq

The Mountain Retreat
  http://members.aol.com/twarren10/

MovieGuide (Ted Baehr)
  http://www.movieguide.org/

Enjoy!
_______________________________________________________________

2. SAMUEL MILLER AND THE "OLD PRINCETON" THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Some names associated with the old Princeton Theological
Seminary are better-known than others.  Many people know the
name Archibald Alexander, the first professor at Princeton
Seminary, and even more know the name of Charles Hodge (famous
for his three volume Systematic Theology), the third professor
at the Seminary.

In between Archibald Alexander and Charles Hodge there was
Samuel Miller, whose Web site can be found here:

  http://samuelmiller.org/

Here's some background information on him:
 _______________________________________________________
/
Samuel Miller (1769-1850) was a Presbyterian Minister in New
York City for over twenty years. Along with Ashbel Green he
took a leading part in the founding of Princeton Theological
Seminary in 1812. A year later he was selected to join
Archibald Alexander as the second instructor at the institution
where he served for thirty-six years as the Professor of
Ecclesiastical History and Church Government.

Princeton Theological Seminary was for over a century to be the
bulwark both of Reformed orthodoxy and zealous evangelicalism.
The first three professors, Alexander, Miller and Charles Hodge
had a decisive influence on this tradition and became household
names in the homes of the godly. The Princetonians combined
faith and learning.... Miller was a prolific writer and took a
significant part in the affairs of Old School Presbyterianism.
The leading men in the Old School body along with the graduates
of the seminary looked upon him as a man of extraordinary
goodness....

  http://home.btconnect.com/Tentmaker-Pub/page48.html
\_______________________________________________________

The Web site devoted to Samuel Miller only hints at his being
"a prolific writer," although the material to which reference
is made (mostly on other Web sites) does deal with some
interesting subjects.  There is reference, for example, to his
book Clerical Manners, which seems to be somewhat of a "work
in progress," so far as publication on the Web is concerned,
since only the first "letter" is currently available (with more
promised, however).  (It should get more interesting as time
goes on.)  Other topics discussed by Samuel Miller include "the
Stage," observance of Christmas and other "Holy-days," baptism
(who ought to be baptized and how?), the office of elder,
revival of religion, and "a brief history" of Old Princeton
Seminary.

Samuel Miller may have been "a prolific writer," but it is
difficult to find his works today, so it is to be hoped that
this site may make more materials available and make people
more aware of this important very early professor of Princeton
Seminary.  (The site also includes a few links to material not
by but about Samuel Miller.)
_______________________________________________________________

3. CHRISTIAN COMPUTING MAGAZINE'S "SAFE SURFING" WEB PAGE

Christian Computing Magazine’s “Safe Surfing” Web Page
  http://tinyurl.com/mfh0

Christian Computing Magazine devoted its November 2000 issue to
"a variety of articles on the subject of the danger and damage
of online pornography."  This Web page (which is not very easy
to find from the magazine's home page at http://www.ccmag.com/)
acts as a starting point for those articles, mainly written
by Steve Hewitt, Editor-in-Chief and Founder of Christian
Computing Magazine.

Steve's articles are thought-provoking and offer a perspective
different from many other sites, which typically concentrate
on the danger of pornography to children:

"So why is Christian Computing Magazine publishing a special
issue dealing with the subject?  Because pornography and
computers have become entwined with the distribution of
pornography via the Internet. And while others have addressed
the dangers of easy access to inappropriate sites for our
children, the fact is that 'adult sites' on the Internet are
not appropriate for Christian adults....  In my opinion, the
greatest danger of easy access to online pornography is found
in the temptation it presents to Christian men."
  http://tinyurl.com/mfhe

Here's where you can find Steve Hewitt's articles:

Christians & Online Pornography: It's Time for a Call to
    Accountability
  http://tinyurl.com/mfhj

Online Pornography - A Greater Temptation
  http://tinyurl.com/mfhe

Think You Will Never Be Tempted to View Online Porn?  Maybe You
    Should Think Again!
  http://tinyurl.com/mfhm

What's So Bad About Viewing Pornography?
  http://tinyurl.com/mfhr

Why Not Just Abandon the Internet?
  http://tinyurl.com/mfhh

For those Christian Dads and other men who are struggling with an addiction to pornography, Steve Hewitt recommends these resources:

Porn-Free
  http://porn-free.org/

Setting Captives Free
  http://settingcaptivesfree.com/

Victims of Pornography
  http://victimsofpornography.org/
_______________________________________________________________

4. "NOT AUTHORIZED TO INCLUDE A LINK" IN CATI??: PART TWO

In the previous issue, I shared my response to someone who
had sent me this communication:

> You are not authorized to include a link or any other
> information regarding [us] on your website(s)....
> Please reply to this email for authorization, or remove any
> and all links to [us] from your web site(s).

What I hadn't mentioned is that the link in question was a link
to a church congregation.  (In the year 2000 I had attempted
to provide links to all ARP, OPC, PCA, RCUS, RPCNA, and URCNA
congregational Web sites on the basis of public information on
the denominational Web sites.)

Following is a follow-up communication.  I have at points made
changes from what was the exact wording of my second response
to protect the identity of the individual, congregation, and
denomination involved.  I think it is a helpful discussion,
and I regret that I can here only present one side of that
discussion, but the arguments of the other side can probably
be inferred from my response to them.

My reason for publishing this material is primarily to urge
Webmasters of church sites to protect private information
related to the members.  (The comments would also apply to
the Webmaster of a site for a Christian school.  Thus I
have included that emphasis as well in the following
comments.)
 _______________________________________________________
/
Thank you for your response.  I think your concerns are
legitimate, but I also think there are other (and more
effective) ways to address them.  As I said, your note caught
me by surprise, since yours is the only congregation in the
PCA, OPC, RPCNA, RCUS, ARP, or URCNA that made such a request.
Yet you and I - whatever our differences in perspective - do
both very strongly believe in the Biblical doctrine of the
total depravity of man.

Let me see whether we agree also on the following.  First of
all, unless I hear otherwise, I assume that you have no
objection to your congregation's being listed on the Web site
of your denomination.  Because of that listing, however, it
naturally follows that your Web address is thus a matter of
public information to any person who goes to the denominational
Web site to look up Web addresses for any or all congregations.

Second, if I were you, my concern would be not so much about
public posting of the address of your Web page, as my concern
would be, say, for the private passing around of that address
by those you describe as "malicious, anti-Christian folks on
the Internet," such as sexual predators.  That might be the
case, for example, if you posted material on your church Web
site of a personal nature (such as pictures of families in the
congregation with young children, as well as their addresses).

Here is the point I'm working toward:  As a Webmaster for a
church or school, if you choose to include personal information
on your Web site, you have a responsibility to protect that
information.  You and I may or may not agree on whether
permission is needed to publish the address of your church
and/or school Web site, but I think we are likely agreed that
(1) as much as you might like it to be otherwise, ultimately
you cannot prevent "malicious, anti-Christian folks on the
Internet," from either publicly posting or privately passing
around such information (again, they can readily get that
information from your denominational Web site), (2) most of the
time people will be accessing that information for benevolent
(not malevolent) purposes (such as their moving to your area
and wanting to find a sound congregation in your city), in
which case you really do want them to find your Web page, and
(3) by allowing access to certain portions of your site ONLY
BY PASSWORD, you can do much to prevent improper access of
personal or private information.

Since you have your own domain name (which, by the way, you
have to be careful about, since you don't own it, but are only
renting it, which means that if you ever choose not to renew
it, you open up to pornographers the right to grab it, as they
have done in other such situations), I would guess that you
have a Web host who would be able to set that up for you. Then
it's a matter of training members of your congregation and/or
parents in your school the importance of protecting that
password and not revealing it to anyone else.

By using a password for certain areas of your Web site, you can
make publicly visible what you want to be publicly visible
(e.g., times of Sunday services and directions to the church)
and keep private what you want to be only privately accessible
(e.g., pictures and addresses of families with small children).
And you can set it up in such a way that the people who access
the public part will not even be aware that there is a private
part (just avoid including in the public part any links to the
private part).

My guess is that most people who would want to link to your
church would have legitimate reasons to do so.  If you have
found otherwise - if you have found any examples of "just any
kook who has a web page" linking to your Web site - I'd be
interested to hear of it.  (Or am I that "kook"? <grin>)  And
if you do find such an instance, I think you are going to be
more likely to find a positive response if you do not announce
in your Subject line, "You are not authorized to include a link
to our site"!  A polite request, I would think, would be more
likely to produce a positive response than a confrontational
command (when obviously the person is unlikely to agree
concerning your having the right to claim such authority
anyway, because if he felt that, he would have asked your
permission in the first place!).

One more thing to think about:  Suppose rather than being a
sound congregation, _you_ were a "kook who has a web page."
Let's suppose that you were a cultic congregation, for
example.  Would you (as what you really are, a Christian of
orthodox belief) not want people to be able to mention that
site in order to refute the error on it?  Or, putting it the
other way around again, since you are a sound congregation,
would you not want to be able to refute slanderous things said
about your congregation on the Web site, say, of a mainline
denominational congregation in your city?  As was said by Tim
Berners-Lee, "On the web, to make reference without making a
link is possible but ineffective - like speaking but with a
paper bag over your head."  You see, you also benefit from the
general consensus (and it is the general consensus) that
"There is no reason to have to ask before making a link to
another site" and you would lose something important if you
were to give up that right.

You say, "there remains that part of me that does not want our
church associated with just any kook who has a web page."  But
a reference to your Web page does not create any link of real
identification of your site with their site to any intelligent
reader.  What it does do is allow you to speak for yourself,
because with the Web address people can visit your site and
see what you yourself have to say.  Not supplying a link
doesn't stop anyone from talking about you (as in my example
of the Web page of a local mainline denomination congregation
including negative comments about your congregation).  If your
Web site address is included, people can visit your site, and
you have the opportunity to speak for yourself on who you are
and what you believe.  Without the Web address, people are
limited to the perspective of the criticizing Web page, and you
don't have the opportunity to speak for yourself.

I didn't intend this note to be a further argument on behalf
of my position as over against your own.  We are Christian
brothers who have a right to courteously disagree with one
another.  I have many good friends in your denomination.  You
and I are on the same side (just maybe not on the same side on
this particular issue).

What I _did_ intend in this note was to persuade you (if you
are not yet doing so) to protect private information on your
site (e.g., by using passwords or simply not posting such
information).  I haven't looked at your site since my receipt
of your earlier e-mail (and I only looked at it briefly then),
so I don't know what your current practice is, but you and I
are thoroughly agreed that there are "malicious, anti-Christian
folks on the Internet."  Since you cannot prevent your Web site
address from becoming known, you as Webmaster need to protect
the people in your congregation (and/or the children and
parents of your school), and one good way to do that is to
restrict entrance to certain portions of your site to those
who have the appropriate password.
\_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________

5. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: INFORMATION ON CATI NEWSLETTER

Like to know what this is?  This is the eighty-first issue of
a free newsletter devoted to "Christians And The Internet"
("CATI," pronounced "Katy," but spelled with a "C" and an "I"
for "Christians" and the "Internet").

Like to subscribe to this free email newsletter?  Just send an
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Like to pass along this issue to others?  You may.  Permission
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Copyright (C) 2003 by Barry Traver, All Rights Reserved.
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